Vulnerability of Human Population Health to Climate Change: state-of-knowledge and future research directions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/256411
Title:
Vulnerability of Human Population Health to Climate Change: state-of-knowledge and future research directions
Authors:
Martens WJM (eds)
Other Titles:
Kwetsbaarheid van volksgezondheid voor klimaatverandering: inventarisatie van de kennis en richtingen voor toekomstig onderzoek
Abstract:
Abstract niet beschikbaar

Health effects of global climate change may include an increase in: heat-related mortality and morbidity, infectious diseases, particularly those that are vector-borne, and malnutrition and dehydration from a threatened food and water supply. Increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer is anticipated to result in an increased incidence of skin cancer and cataracts, as well as possibly causing immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to other diseases. Different populations, having varying levels of natural, technical and social resources, would differ in their vulnerability to the health impacts. Although some effects may be beneficial, most are expected to be adverse. Health impacts in other parts of the world, with limited resources to react to climate change, are therefore likely to be more severe than those in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, the Dutch population too will experience the effects of climatic change in the form of, for example, changes in skin cancer rates, increased mortality due to increasing numbers of heatwaves and increased risk of the outbreak of certain infectious diseases. However, as many uncertainties remain, the Dutch Programming Committee has identified several areas as requiring the initiation and/or continuation of the necessary research, particularly the effects of climate change on infectious (vector) borne diseases and imrnune suppression by increased ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion.
Affiliation:
PB-NOP; Universiteit Limburg
Publisher:
Universiteit Limburg; Maastricht
Issue Date:
31-Dec-1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/256411
Additional Links:
http://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/410200004.html
Type:
Onderzoeksrapport
Language:
en
Description:
Available from National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, fax: +31 30 2744436, e-mail: inge.timofeeff@rivm.nl.
Sponsors:
SG-NOP
Appears in Collections:
RIVM official reports

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartens WJM (eds)-
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T14:00:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-12T14:00:13Z-
dc.date.issued1996-12-31-
dc.identifier410200004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/256411-
dc.descriptionAvailable from National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, fax: +31 30 2744436, e-mail: inge.timofeeff@rivm.nl.en
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaarnl
dc.description.abstractHealth effects of global climate change may include an increase in: heat-related mortality and morbidity, infectious diseases, particularly those that are vector-borne, and malnutrition and dehydration from a threatened food and water supply. Increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation due to depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer is anticipated to result in an increased incidence of skin cancer and cataracts, as well as possibly causing immunosuppression and increased susceptibility to other diseases. Different populations, having varying levels of natural, technical and social resources, would differ in their vulnerability to the health impacts. Although some effects may be beneficial, most are expected to be adverse. Health impacts in other parts of the world, with limited resources to react to climate change, are therefore likely to be more severe than those in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, the Dutch population too will experience the effects of climatic change in the form of, for example, changes in skin cancer rates, increased mortality due to increasing numbers of heatwaves and increased risk of the outbreak of certain infectious diseases. However, as many uncertainties remain, the Dutch Programming Committee has identified several areas as requiring the initiation and/or continuation of the necessary research, particularly the effects of climate change on infectious (vector) borne diseases and imrnune suppression by increased ultraviolet radiation due to ozone depletion.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSG-NOP-
dc.format.extent57 p-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherUniversiteit Limburg-
dc.publisherMaastricht-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Change NOP-NRP report 410200004-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/410200004.html-
dc.subject11nl
dc.subjectklimaatveranderingnl
dc.subjecteffectennl
dc.subjectgezondheidnl
dc.subjectozonlaagnl
dc.subjectuvnl
dc.subjectstralingnl
dc.subjectclimatic changesen
dc.subjecteffectsen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectozone layeren
dc.subjectuv radiationen
dc.titleVulnerability of Human Population Health to Climate Change: state-of-knowledge and future research directionsen
dc.title.alternativeKwetsbaarheid van volksgezondheid voor klimaatverandering: inventarisatie van de kennis en richtingen voor toekomstig onderzoeknl
dc.typeOnderzoeksrapport-
dc.contributor.departmentPB-NOP-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversiteit Limburg-
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T14:00:14Z-
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