Emergence and resurgence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a public-health threat.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5555
Title:
Emergence and resurgence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a public-health threat.
Authors:
Grundmann, Hajo; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta; Boyce, John; Tiemersma, Edine
Abstract:
Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that colonises the skin and is present in the anterior nares in about 25-30% of healthy people. Dependent on its intrinsic virulence or the ability of the host to contain its opportunistic behaviour, S aureus can cause a range of diseases in man. The bacterium readily acquires resistance against all classes of antibiotics by one of two distinct mechanisms: mutation of an existing bacterial gene or horizontal transfer of a resistance gene from another bacterium. Several mobile genetic elements carrying exogenous antibiotic resistance genes might mediate resistance acquisition. Of all the resistance traits S aureus has acquired since the introduction of antimicrobial chemotherapy in the 1930s, meticillin resistance is clinically the most important, since a single genetic element confers resistance to the most commonly prescribed class of antimicrobials--the beta-lactam antibiotics, which include penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems.
Citation:
Lancet 2006, 368(9538):874-85
Issue Date:
2-Sep-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5555
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(06)68853-3
PubMed ID:
16950365
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1474-547X
Appears in Collections:
Public Health and Health Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrundmann, Hajo-
dc.contributor.authorAires-de-Sousa, Marta-
dc.contributor.authorBoyce, John-
dc.contributor.authorTiemersma, Edine-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-24T11:59:06Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-24T11:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2006-09-02-
dc.identifier.citationLancet 2006, 368(9538):874-85en
dc.identifier.issn1474-547X-
dc.identifier.pmid16950365-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0140-6736(06)68853-3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/5555-
dc.description.abstractStaphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that colonises the skin and is present in the anterior nares in about 25-30% of healthy people. Dependent on its intrinsic virulence or the ability of the host to contain its opportunistic behaviour, S aureus can cause a range of diseases in man. The bacterium readily acquires resistance against all classes of antibiotics by one of two distinct mechanisms: mutation of an existing bacterial gene or horizontal transfer of a resistance gene from another bacterium. Several mobile genetic elements carrying exogenous antibiotic resistance genes might mediate resistance acquisition. Of all the resistance traits S aureus has acquired since the introduction of antimicrobial chemotherapy in the 1930s, meticillin resistance is clinically the most important, since a single genetic element confers resistance to the most commonly prescribed class of antimicrobials--the beta-lactam antibiotics, which include penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems.en
dc.format.extent491367 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleEmergence and resurgence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a public-health threat.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-
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