Malariameldingen in 2005: Evaluatie van de richtlijnen van het Landelijk Coördinatiecentrum Reizigersadvisering (LCR) voor malariaprofylaxe

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5659
Title:
Malariameldingen in 2005: Evaluatie van de richtlijnen van het Landelijk Coördinatiecentrum Reizigersadvisering (LCR) voor malariaprofylaxe
Authors:
Sondera, G J B; Plas, Simone M van der
Other Titles:
Malaria notifications in 2005: Evaluation of LCR-guidelines for malaria prophylaxis
Abstract:
In The Netherlands, malaria is a notifiable disease in group C since 1999: the laboratory where the patient tested positive has to report the test results, together with a few demographic data, to the National Center for Disease Control (CIb). Since January 2005, the National Coordination Center for Travelers Health Advice (LCR) added some questions to the voluntary part of these reports in order to obtain more insight in the prevalence of malaria in people who used prophylaxis according to the LCR guidelines, and to evaluate these guidelines. The goal of the LCR guidelines is to prevent malaria caused by P. falciparum. All reported cases with a disease onset date in 2005 were evaluated. In 2005, 288 cases of malaria were reported. Seventy-five (26%) malaria patients used chemoprophylaxis. In total, 32 (11%) contracted malaria despite the use of chemoprophylaxis according to the LCR guidelines. Eight of these cases concerned malaria caused by P. falciparum. Four of these had used second choice chemoprophylaxis, to which parasitic resistance is common. In the blood sample of one patient no mefloquine was detected. Of the other three, the thick smear or EDTA blood was not available for resistance tests. Most likely, all other cases had a delayed onset malaria, which cannot be prevented by the currently available chemoprophylaxis. Based on these data, we conclude that the LCR guidelines are still valid. It is advised that in cases of breakthrough malaria caused by P. falciparum blood samples are taken to determine chloroquine or mefloquine levels where applicable, and to save EDTA blood for molecular confirmation of the species and determination of resistant parasites.
Publisher:
RIVM
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5659
Submitted date:
2006-10-27
Type:
Article
Language:
other
Appears in Collections:
Infectious Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSondera, G J B-
dc.contributor.authorPlas, Simone M van der-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-27T20:56:12Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-27T20:56:12Z-
dc.date.issued2006-08-01-
dc.date.submitted2006-10-27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/5659-
dc.description.abstractIn The Netherlands, malaria is a notifiable disease in group C since 1999: the laboratory where the patient tested positive has to report the test results, together with a few demographic data, to the National Center for Disease Control (CIb). Since January 2005, the National Coordination Center for Travelers Health Advice (LCR) added some questions to the voluntary part of these reports in order to obtain more insight in the prevalence of malaria in people who used prophylaxis according to the LCR guidelines, and to evaluate these guidelines. The goal of the LCR guidelines is to prevent malaria caused by P. falciparum. All reported cases with a disease onset date in 2005 were evaluated. In 2005, 288 cases of malaria were reported. Seventy-five (26%) malaria patients used chemoprophylaxis. In total, 32 (11%) contracted malaria despite the use of chemoprophylaxis according to the LCR guidelines. Eight of these cases concerned malaria caused by P. falciparum. Four of these had used second choice chemoprophylaxis, to which parasitic resistance is common. In the blood sample of one patient no mefloquine was detected. Of the other three, the thick smear or EDTA blood was not available for resistance tests. Most likely, all other cases had a delayed onset malaria, which cannot be prevented by the currently available chemoprophylaxis. Based on these data, we conclude that the LCR guidelines are still valid. It is advised that in cases of breakthrough malaria caused by P. falciparum blood samples are taken to determine chloroquine or mefloquine levels where applicable, and to save EDTA blood for molecular confirmation of the species and determination of resistant parasites.en
dc.format.extent28473 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.language.isootheren
dc.publisherRIVMen
dc.titleMalariameldingen in 2005: Evaluatie van de richtlijnen van het Landelijk Coördinatiecentrum Reizigersadvisering (LCR) voor malariaprofylaxeen
dc.title.alternativeMalaria notifications in 2005: Evaluation of LCR-guidelines for malaria prophylaxisen
dc.typeArticleen
All Items in WARP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.