Epidemiologische trends in cryptokokkose : De Cryptococcus gattii-uitbraak in Canada

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5677
Title:
Epidemiologische trends in cryptokokkose : De Cryptococcus gattii-uitbraak in Canada
Authors:
Hagen, F; Boekhout, T
Other Titles:
Epidemiological trends in cryptococcosis - The Cryptococcus gattii outbreak in Canada
Abstract:
Cryptococcosis is, when untreated, a fatal disease, which in the Netherlands is mainly caused by the basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, and in more rare cases by Cryptococcus gattii. Infections with C. gattii occur almost only in immunocompetent individuals, while C. neoformans has a predilection for immunodeficient humans. Another major epidemiological difference between both species is the restriction of C. gattii to tropical and sub-tropical regions, whereas C. neoformans can be found worldwide. However, the distribution pattern of C. gattii has dramatically changed by an ongoing outbreak in the temperate climate of Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada). Epidemiological research revealed that the outbreak is caused by the rare AFLP genotype 6 (= VGII) of C. gattii. Only a few strains of this genotype were known before this outbreak. Since the past decade, however, strains of this genotype are isolated more frequently, especially in South America. In the Netherlands, the number of infections with C. neoformans in HIV/AIDS patients shows a decreasing trend, due to the introduction of the HAART therapy. However, clinicians and microbiologists should also be alert for infections caused by C. gattii in (immunocompetent) individuals who travelled recently to Vancouver Island and the main land of British Columbia (Canada).
Publisher:
RIVM
Issue Date:
1-Jun-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/5677
Type:
Article
Language:
other; nl
Appears in Collections:
Infectious Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHagen, F-
dc.contributor.authorBoekhout, T-
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-30T13:45:36Z-
dc.date.available2006-10-30T13:45:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/5677-
dc.description.abstractCryptococcosis is, when untreated, a fatal disease, which in the Netherlands is mainly caused by the basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, and in more rare cases by Cryptococcus gattii. Infections with C. gattii occur almost only in immunocompetent individuals, while C. neoformans has a predilection for immunodeficient humans. Another major epidemiological difference between both species is the restriction of C. gattii to tropical and sub-tropical regions, whereas C. neoformans can be found worldwide. However, the distribution pattern of C. gattii has dramatically changed by an ongoing outbreak in the temperate climate of Vancouver Island (British Columbia, Canada). Epidemiological research revealed that the outbreak is caused by the rare AFLP genotype 6 (= VGII) of C. gattii. Only a few strains of this genotype were known before this outbreak. Since the past decade, however, strains of this genotype are isolated more frequently, especially in South America. In the Netherlands, the number of infections with C. neoformans in HIV/AIDS patients shows a decreasing trend, due to the introduction of the HAART therapy. However, clinicians and microbiologists should also be alert for infections caused by C. gattii in (immunocompetent) individuals who travelled recently to Vancouver Island and the main land of British Columbia (Canada).en
dc.format.extent26042 bytes-
dc.format.extent7260 bytes-
dc.format.extent340121 bytes-
dc.format.extent80795 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.format.mimetypeimage/gif-
dc.format.mimetypeimage/gif-
dc.format.mimetypeimage/gif-
dc.language.isootheren
dc.language.isonl-
dc.publisherRIVMen
dc.titleEpidemiologische trends in cryptokokkose : De Cryptococcus gattii-uitbraak in Canadaen
dc.title.alternativeEpidemiological trends in cryptococcosis - The Cryptococcus gattii outbreak in Canadaen
dc.typeArticleen
All Items in WARP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.