Detection of noroviruses in foods: a study on virus extraction procedures in foods implicated in outbreaks of human gastroenteritis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/6761
Title:
Detection of noroviruses in foods: a study on virus extraction procedures in foods implicated in outbreaks of human gastroenteritis.
Authors:
Rutjes, Saskia A; Lodder-Verschoor, Froukje; Poel, Wim H M van der; Duynhoven, Yvonne T H P van; Roda Husman, Ana Maria de
Abstract:
Disease outbreaks in which foods are epidemiologically implicated as the common source are frequently reported. Noroviruses and enteric hepatitis A viruses are among the most prevalent causative agents of foodborne diseases. However, the detection of these viruses in foods other than shellfish is often time-consuming and unsuccessful. In this study, three virus concentration methods were compared: polyethylene glycol (PEG) plus NaCl, ultracentrifugation, and ultrafiltration. Two RNA extraction methods, TRIzol and RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen), were compared for detection of viruses in whipped cream and lettuce (as representatives of the dairy and vegetable-fruit food groups, respectively). A seeding experiment with canine calicivirus was conducted to determine the efficiency of each virus extraction procedure. The PEG-NaCl-TRIzol method was most efficient for the detection of viruses in whipped cream and the ultracentrifugation-RNeasy-Mini Kit procedure was best for detection on lettuce. Based on the seeding experiments, food items implicated in norovirus-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks were subjected to the optimal procedure for a specific composition and matrix. No noroviruses were detected in the implicated food items, possibly because the concentration of virus on the food item was too low or because of the presence of inhibitory factors. For each food group, a specific procedure is optimal. Inhibitory factors should be controlled in these procedures because they influence virus detection in food.
Citation:
J. Food Prot. 2006, 69(8):1949-56
Issue Date:
1-Aug-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/6761
PubMed ID:
16924922
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0362-028X
Appears in Collections:
Nutrition and Drinking Water

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRutjes, Saskia A-
dc.contributor.authorLodder-Verschoor, Froukje-
dc.contributor.authorPoel, Wim H M van der-
dc.contributor.authorDuynhoven, Yvonne T H P van-
dc.contributor.authorRoda Husman, Ana Maria de-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T09:58:32Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-03T09:58:32Z-
dc.date.issued2006-08-01-
dc.identifier.citationJ. Food Prot. 2006, 69(8):1949-56en
dc.identifier.issn0362-028X-
dc.identifier.pmid16924922-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/6761-
dc.description.abstractDisease outbreaks in which foods are epidemiologically implicated as the common source are frequently reported. Noroviruses and enteric hepatitis A viruses are among the most prevalent causative agents of foodborne diseases. However, the detection of these viruses in foods other than shellfish is often time-consuming and unsuccessful. In this study, three virus concentration methods were compared: polyethylene glycol (PEG) plus NaCl, ultracentrifugation, and ultrafiltration. Two RNA extraction methods, TRIzol and RNeasy Mini Kit (Qiagen), were compared for detection of viruses in whipped cream and lettuce (as representatives of the dairy and vegetable-fruit food groups, respectively). A seeding experiment with canine calicivirus was conducted to determine the efficiency of each virus extraction procedure. The PEG-NaCl-TRIzol method was most efficient for the detection of viruses in whipped cream and the ultracentrifugation-RNeasy-Mini Kit procedure was best for detection on lettuce. Based on the seeding experiments, food items implicated in norovirus-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks were subjected to the optimal procedure for a specific composition and matrix. No noroviruses were detected in the implicated food items, possibly because the concentration of virus on the food item was too low or because of the presence of inhibitory factors. For each food group, a specific procedure is optimal. Inhibitory factors should be controlled in these procedures because they influence virus detection in food.en
dc.format.extent98093 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleDetection of noroviruses in foods: a study on virus extraction procedures in foods implicated in outbreaks of human gastroenteritis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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