Identification of TUB as a novel candidate gene influencing body weight in humans.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/7039
Title:
Identification of TUB as a novel candidate gene influencing body weight in humans.
Authors:
Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Custers, Anne; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V van; Gorp, Patrick J J van; Lindsey, Patrick J; Tilburg, Jonathan H O van; Zhernakova, Sasha; Feskens, Edith J M; A, Daphne L van der; Dollé, Martijn E T; Haeften, Timon W van; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca
Abstract:
Previously, we identified a locus on 11p influencing obesity in families with type 2 diabetes. Based on mouse studies, we selected TUB as a functional candidate gene and performed association studies to determine whether this controls obesity. We analyzed the genotypes of 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around TUB in 492 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients with known BMI values. One SNP (rs1528133) was found to have a significant effect on BMI (1.54 kg/m(2), P = 0.006). This association was confirmed in a population enriched for type 2 diabetes, using 750 individuals who were not selected for type 2 diabetes. Two SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with rs1528133 and mapping to the 3' end of TUB, rs2272382, and rs2272383 also affected BMI by 1.3 kg/m2 (P = 0.016 and P = 0.010, respectively). Combined analysis confirmed this association (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002, respectively). Moreover, comparing 349 obese subjects (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) from the combined cohort with 289 normal subjects (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) revealed that the protective alleles have a lower frequency in obese subjects (odds ratio 1.32 [95% CI 1.04-1.67], P = 0.022). Altogether, data from the tubby mouse as well as these data suggest that TUB could be an important factor in controlling the central regulation of body weight in humans.
Citation:
Diabetes 2006, 55(2):385-9
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/7039
PubMed ID:
16443771
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0012-1797
Appears in Collections:
Public Health and Health Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShiri-Sverdlov, Ronit-
dc.contributor.authorCusters, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorVliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V van-
dc.contributor.authorGorp, Patrick J J van-
dc.contributor.authorLindsey, Patrick J-
dc.contributor.authorTilburg, Jonathan H O van-
dc.contributor.authorZhernakova, Sasha-
dc.contributor.authorFeskens, Edith J M-
dc.contributor.authorA, Daphne L van der-
dc.contributor.authorDollé, Martijn E T-
dc.contributor.authorHaeften, Timon W van-
dc.contributor.authorKoeleman, Bobby P C-
dc.contributor.authorHofker, Marten H-
dc.contributor.authorWijmenga, Cisca-
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-09T10:47:53Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-09T10:47:53Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-01-
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes 2006, 55(2):385-9en
dc.identifier.issn0012-1797-
dc.identifier.pmid16443771-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/7039-
dc.description.abstractPreviously, we identified a locus on 11p influencing obesity in families with type 2 diabetes. Based on mouse studies, we selected TUB as a functional candidate gene and performed association studies to determine whether this controls obesity. We analyzed the genotypes of 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around TUB in 492 unrelated type 2 diabetic patients with known BMI values. One SNP (rs1528133) was found to have a significant effect on BMI (1.54 kg/m(2), P = 0.006). This association was confirmed in a population enriched for type 2 diabetes, using 750 individuals who were not selected for type 2 diabetes. Two SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with rs1528133 and mapping to the 3' end of TUB, rs2272382, and rs2272383 also affected BMI by 1.3 kg/m2 (P = 0.016 and P = 0.010, respectively). Combined analysis confirmed this association (P = 0.005 and P = 0.002, respectively). Moreover, comparing 349 obese subjects (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) from the combined cohort with 289 normal subjects (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) revealed that the protective alleles have a lower frequency in obese subjects (odds ratio 1.32 [95% CI 1.04-1.67], P = 0.022). Altogether, data from the tubby mouse as well as these data suggest that TUB could be an important factor in controlling the central regulation of body weight in humans.en
dc.format.extent212570 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleIdentification of TUB as a novel candidate gene influencing body weight in humans.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES-

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