Valuing the benefits of environmental policy: the Netherlands

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/9526
Title:
Valuing the benefits of environmental policy: the Netherlands
Authors:
Howarth A; Pearce DW; Ozdemiroglu E; Seccombe-Hett T; Wieringa K; Streefkerk CM; Hollander AEM de
Other Titles:
Waardering van de baten van milieubeleid in Nederland
Abstract:
This study seeks to set priorities for environmental policy in the Netherlands. We focused on seven environmental issues including: climate change, acidification, low level ozone, particulate matter, noise, eutrophication and land contamination. These issues are prioritised using three different approaches: damage assessment, public opinion and 'disability adjusted life years'(DALYs). According to the damage assessment approach the priorities, in terms of potential benefits from full control, are low level ozone, land contamination and particulate matter, followed by acidification and climate change, whilst noise and eutrophication are estimated to yield the lowest potential benefits from control. However, in the absence of cost estimates no conclusions can be reached on the desirability of control measures. Public opinion surveys show that environmental issues other than the seven considered in this study are a major concern for the Dutch public, namely chemical release and oil pollution. However, focusing on the seven issues considered in this study, the Dutch public rank, climate change, acidification, eutrophication and air pollution from cars (interpreted as low-level ozone and PM10) as the issues of most concern. According to the DALYs approach the health effects of air pollution from particulate matter, and to a certain degree from low level ozone, dominate the disease burden. The future disease burden is largely due to changes in the population structure, i.e. an increasing, aged population. Another environmental problem associated with a high disease burden is noise exposure from road and air traffic. Based on a simple 'Borda count', a final ranking for the environmental issues is made. This study concludes that land contamination, climate change and particulate matter are top priority environmental issues in the Netherlands, followed by acidification, low level ozone, eutrophication and finally noise. These findings suggest that future policies focusing on the top issues may yield considerable benefit depending on their cost of control. Although ranking environmental issues is useful in the sense of highlighting priority issues and indicating if there is any surprise environmental issues for the Netherlands. It is important to note that the benefit estimates offer only some guidance on environmental priorities, in the absence of data on costs of implementing policies only part of the picture necessary for establishing priorities is provided. For a full-scale economic analysis benefit estimates need to be compared with cost estimates within a CBA framework. This is outside the scope of this study, however a separate paper on the issues relating to and experience with such CBAs is presented in Annex II.
Other Contributors:
EFTEC
Affiliation:
MNV
Publisher:
Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM
Issue Date:
29-Jun-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/9526
Additional Links:
http://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/481505024.html
Language:
en
Series/Report no.:
RIVM Rapport 481505024
Appears in Collections:
RIVM reports - old archive

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHowarth Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPearce DWen_US
dc.contributor.authorOzdemiroglu Een_US
dc.contributor.authorSeccombe-Hett Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorWieringa Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorStreefkerk CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHollander AEM deen_US
dc.contributor.otherEFTECen_US
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-27T12:51:07Z-
dc.date.available2007-02-27T12:51:07Z-
dc.date.issued2001-06-29en_US
dc.identifier481505024en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/9526-
dc.description.abstractThis study seeks to set priorities for environmental policy in the Netherlands. We focused on seven environmental issues including: climate change, acidification, low level ozone, particulate matter, noise, eutrophication and land contamination. These issues are prioritised using three different approaches: damage assessment, public opinion and 'disability adjusted life years'(DALYs). According to the damage assessment approach the priorities, in terms of potential benefits from full control, are low level ozone, land contamination and particulate matter, followed by acidification and climate change, whilst noise and eutrophication are estimated to yield the lowest potential benefits from control. However, in the absence of cost estimates no conclusions can be reached on the desirability of control measures. Public opinion surveys show that environmental issues other than the seven considered in this study are a major concern for the Dutch public, namely chemical release and oil pollution. However, focusing on the seven issues considered in this study, the Dutch public rank, climate change, acidification, eutrophication and air pollution from cars (interpreted as low-level ozone and PM10) as the issues of most concern. According to the DALYs approach the health effects of air pollution from particulate matter, and to a certain degree from low level ozone, dominate the disease burden. The future disease burden is largely due to changes in the population structure, i.e. an increasing, aged population. Another environmental problem associated with a high disease burden is noise exposure from road and air traffic. Based on a simple 'Borda count', a final ranking for the environmental issues is made. This study concludes that land contamination, climate change and particulate matter are top priority environmental issues in the Netherlands, followed by acidification, low level ozone, eutrophication and finally noise. These findings suggest that future policies focusing on the top issues may yield considerable benefit depending on their cost of control. Although ranking environmental issues is useful in the sense of highlighting priority issues and indicating if there is any surprise environmental issues for the Netherlands. It is important to note that the benefit estimates offer only some guidance on environmental priorities, in the absence of data on costs of implementing policies only part of the picture necessary for establishing priorities is provided. For a full-scale economic analysis benefit estimates need to be compared with cost estimates within a CBA framework. This is outside the scope of this study, however a separate paper on the issues relating to and experience with such CBAs is presented in Annex II.en
dc.format.extent1242000 bytesen_US
dc.format.extent1270887 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRIVM Rapport 481505024en_US
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/481505024.htmlen_US
dc.subject.otherenvironmental policyen
dc.subject.otheropinionen
dc.subject.otherassessmenten
dc.subject.otherevaluationen
dc.subject.othercost-benefit analysisen
dc.subject.otherdisability adjusted life yearsen
dc.subject.otherdalyen
dc.subject.othermilieubeleidnl
dc.subject.otherpublieke opinienl
dc.subject.othertoetsingnl
dc.subject.otherevaluatienl
dc.titleValuing the benefits of environmental policy: the Netherlandsen_US
dc.title.alternativeWaardering van de baten van milieubeleid in Nederlanden_US
dc.contributor.departmentMNVen_US
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