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dc.contributor.authorRotmans J
dc.contributor.authorSwart RJ
dc.contributor.authorElzen MGJ den
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T12:03:16Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T12:03:16Z
dc.date.issued1991-09-30
dc.identifier222901008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/255491
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
dc.description.abstractMethane has been a major contributor to the enhanced greenhouse effect during the 1980s, second only to carbon dioxide. Because of uncertainties about the sources and sinks of methane, policy discussions focus on more manageable substances like carbon dioxide and CFCs. In this report it is argued that international response with respect to methane does not have to wail until the uncertainties are resolved or carbon dioxide controls have been negotiated. Methane has a short lifetime relative to most other greenhouse gases. Model calculations with the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect indicate that a 20% reduction of methane emissions combined with a stabilization of carbon monoxide emissions by 2025 would probably stabilize methane concentrations at present-day levels. A stricter carbon monoxide emissions reduction by 35% would even permit the emissions of methane to increase with 10-15% to stabilize atmospheric concentrations. Existing controls of ozone and nitrogen oxides would have to be strenghtened. A sonsiderable slowing down of the present rate of increase (0,9%) around the turn of the century would be possible. Through improved management technqiues such controls are considered to be a realistic option in the not too distant future. This offers a unique opportunity to show globally that effective control of greenhouse gases is indeed possible. If temperature feedbacks on methane emissions from natural wetlands, rice paddies and methane hydrates do materialize, the reductions would have to be larger, but not as large as the reductions required to stabilize the atmospheric concentrations of longer-lived greenhouse gases. A protocol on methane as part of a global climate convention should focus on technology transfer and increased research opportunities especially in developing countries.
dc.description.sponsorshipDGM/L Nationaal Onderzoeksprogramme "Mondiale Luchtverontreiniging en Klimaatverandering"
dc.format.extent33 p
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofRIVM Rapport 222901008
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/222901008.html
dc.subject12nl
dc.subject91-3nl
dc.subjectatmosferische concentratiesnl
dc.subjectmethaannl
dc.subjectatmoshperhic concentrationsnl
dc.subjectmethanenl
dc.titleStabilizing atmospheric concentrations ; towards international methane controleen
dc.title.alternativeStabilisatie van atmosferische concentraties: op naar internationale controle van methaannl
dc.typeReport
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T12:03:17Z
html.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
html.description.abstractMethane has been a major contributor to the enhanced greenhouse effect during the 1980s, second only to carbon dioxide. Because of uncertainties about the sources and sinks of methane, policy discussions focus on more manageable substances like carbon dioxide and CFCs. In this report it is argued that international response with respect to methane does not have to wail until the uncertainties are resolved or carbon dioxide controls have been negotiated. Methane has a short lifetime relative to most other greenhouse gases. Model calculations with the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect indicate that a 20% reduction of methane emissions combined with a stabilization of carbon monoxide emissions by 2025 would probably stabilize methane concentrations at present-day levels. A stricter carbon monoxide emissions reduction by 35% would even permit the emissions of methane to increase with 10-15% to stabilize atmospheric concentrations. Existing controls of ozone and nitrogen oxides would have to be strenghtened. A sonsiderable slowing down of the present rate of increase (0,9%) around the turn of the century would be possible. Through improved management technqiues such controls are considered to be a realistic option in the not too distant future. This offers a unique opportunity to show globally that effective control of greenhouse gases is indeed possible. If temperature feedbacks on methane emissions from natural wetlands, rice paddies and methane hydrates do materialize, the reductions would have to be larger, but not as large as the reductions required to stabilize the atmospheric concentrations of longer-lived greenhouse gases. A protocol on methane as part of a global climate convention should focus on technology transfer and increased research opportunities especially in developing countries.


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