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dc.contributor.authorKohsiek LHM (eds)
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T14:10:15Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T14:10:15Z
dc.date.issued1995-09-30
dc.identifier251701022
dc.identifier.isbn9060928814
dc.identifier.issn9060928814
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/256523
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
dc.description.abstractThe growth of industrial production, consumption, transport and energy use over the past years has not propagated to a similar increase of substances affecting the environment. The 'disconnection' between the growth of the Gross National Product and the resulting development of environmental pressure has increasingly become visible. Implementing environmental measures has to a large extent contributed to this 'disconnection'. This is the most important conclusion of this first Environmental Balance. Policy targets over 1994/95 have been met with respect to (a) the reduction of atmospheric emissions of sulphur dioxide and ammonia, (b) the decrease of discharges of phosphates, cadmium and chromium to water, and (c) the treatment of priority waste compounds. Targets with respect to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and carbon dioxide, and discharges to water of nitrogen compounds and other heavy metals have not yet been satisfied. The generally positive development of environmental pressure does not imply that the environmental quality improves to the same extent. In some cases, Dutch emission reductions of substances do not immediately bring about an improvement of environmental quality due to low removal rates of particular substances and unfavourable developments abroad. The Environmental Balance points out that the air and surface water quality has improved, despite environmental quality guidelines still being exceeded in some cases. Air pollution and noise continue to exercise a negative impact on health. Concentrations of greenhouse gases and substances which damage the ozone layer have increased over the past years, and nitrogen concentrations have remained high both in groundwater and in surface waters. Acid deposition decreased. The populations of almost all vulnerable species in nature have decreased due to a variety of causes including acidification, eutrophication, desiccation and reductions of habitat areas, however, the improved quality of air and water has brought about positive impacts in a number of cases.
dc.description.sponsorshipRIVM
dc.format.extent100 p
dc.language.isonl
dc.relation.ispartofMilieubalans , RIVM Rapport 251701022
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/251701022.html
dc.subject12nl
dc.titleMilieubalans 95. Het Nederlandse milieu verklaardnl
dc.title.alternativeEnvironmental Balance 95. Assessing the Dutch Environmenten
dc.typeOnderzoeksrapport
dc.contributor.departmentLAE
dc.contributor.departmentMTV
dc.contributor.departmentLLO
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T14:10:16Z
html.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
html.description.abstractThe growth of industrial production, consumption, transport and energy use over the past years has not propagated to a similar increase of substances affecting the environment. The 'disconnection' between the growth of the Gross National Product and the resulting development of environmental pressure has increasingly become visible. Implementing environmental measures has to a large extent contributed to this 'disconnection'. This is the most important conclusion of this first Environmental Balance. Policy targets over 1994/95 have been met with respect to (a) the reduction of atmospheric emissions of sulphur dioxide and ammonia, (b) the decrease of discharges of phosphates, cadmium and chromium to water, and (c) the treatment of priority waste compounds. Targets with respect to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds and carbon dioxide, and discharges to water of nitrogen compounds and other heavy metals have not yet been satisfied. The generally positive development of environmental pressure does not imply that the environmental quality improves to the same extent. In some cases, Dutch emission reductions of substances do not immediately bring about an improvement of environmental quality due to low removal rates of particular substances and unfavourable developments abroad. The Environmental Balance points out that the air and surface water quality has improved, despite environmental quality guidelines still being exceeded in some cases. Air pollution and noise continue to exercise a negative impact on health. Concentrations of greenhouse gases and substances which damage the ozone layer have increased over the past years, and nitrogen concentrations have remained high both in groundwater and in surface waters. Acid deposition decreased. The populations of almost all vulnerable species in nature have decreased due to a variety of causes including acidification, eutrophication, desiccation and reductions of habitat areas, however, the improved quality of air and water has brought about positive impacts in a number of cases.


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