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dc.contributor.authorSlob AFL
dc.contributor.authorHoorn ThMM van
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T16:37:50Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T16:37:50Z
dc.date.issued1999-08-16
dc.identifier410200012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/258134
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
dc.description.abstractThe Dutch National Research Program (NRP) on global air pollution and climate change commissioned a study on major shifts in societal trends that are relevant for the climate problem. The main objective of this study was to give direction to future research on this topic for the National Research Program. Several methods were used to achieve this goal: literature study, interviews with experts, researchers, policymakers and involved parties and a concluding workshop on the subject. The conclusion of the study was that four main trends in our society have a relationship, either positive or negative, with the climate problem: individualisation, ageing of the population, globalisation and the rapid development of information and communication technologies. Options to change or break trends can be found in technological innovations, changes in institutions and changes in human behaviour. Several recommendations were made for future research in the framework of the Dutch NRP. This research should focus on trends as such, on behaviour and on policy strategies for coping with trends and shifts in trends. The following research topics were recommended to the Steering Group for further study: - a general study on trends, trendbreaks and climate change, - development of information and communication technologies as a driver of trendbreaks, - interaction between technology and behaviour, - time spending, trendbreaks and the climate problem, - globalization, - new policy methods and strategies aiming at trendbreaks.
dc.description.sponsorshipSG-NOPII
dc.format.extent130 p
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Change NOP-NRP report 410200012
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/410200012.html
dc.subject04nl
dc.subjectklimaatveranderingnl
dc.subjectmaatschappelijke factorennl
dc.subjectbeleidnl
dc.subjecteffectennl
dc.subjectinformatienl
dc.subjectcommunicatienl
dc.subjectmondiaalnl
dc.subjectclimatic changesen
dc.subjectsocial factorsen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjecteffectsen
dc.subjectinformationen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectglobalen
dc.subjectsocietal trendsen
dc.subjectcommunication technologyen
dc.subjecttime consumptionen
dc.subjectglobalisationen
dc.titleMajor Shifts in Societal Trends and Their Impact on Climate Changeen
dc.title.alternativeMaatschappelijke trendbreuken en klimaatveranderingnl
dc.typeReport
dc.contributor.departmentNOP
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T16:37:51Z
html.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
html.description.abstractThe Dutch National Research Program (NRP) on global air pollution and climate change commissioned a study on major shifts in societal trends that are relevant for the climate problem. The main objective of this study was to give direction to future research on this topic for the National Research Program. Several methods were used to achieve this goal: literature study, interviews with experts, researchers, policymakers and involved parties and a concluding workshop on the subject. The conclusion of the study was that four main trends in our society have a relationship, either positive or negative, with the climate problem: individualisation, ageing of the population, globalisation and the rapid development of information and communication technologies. Options to change or break trends can be found in technological innovations, changes in institutions and changes in human behaviour. Several recommendations were made for future research in the framework of the Dutch NRP. This research should focus on trends as such, on behaviour and on policy strategies for coping with trends and shifts in trends. The following research topics were recommended to the Steering Group for further study: - a general study on trends, trendbreaks and climate change, - development of information and communication technologies as a driver of trendbreaks, - interaction between technology and behaviour, - time spending, trendbreaks and the climate problem, - globalization, - new policy methods and strategies aiming at trendbreaks.


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