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dc.contributor.authorVaas LH
dc.contributor.authorKal HB
dc.contributor.authorde Jong P
dc.contributor.authorSlooff W
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T18:35:54Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T18:35:54Z
dc.date.issued1993-01-31
dc.identifier710401021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/259475
dc.descriptionBetreft de engelse editie van 710401014<br>en
dc.description.abstractThis document on the subject of radon contains data on sources, emissions, dispersion and risks. Risks are based on a comparison of exposure levels and detrimental effects. The main risk to humans from radon is the induction of lung cancer. Possible techniques to reduce these risks, as well as the costs involved, are discussed. A number of potential policy scenarios for radon are also examined. The mean Rn-222 concentration in Dutch living rooms is 29 Bq m-3 (range 8-140 Bq m-3), which falls within the range of 20-90 Bq m-3 observed in other European countries. The soil (averaging about 70%) and the building materials used (about 30%) are the principal contributors to the Rn-222 concentrations in indoor air. The mean outdoor atmospheric concentrations in the Netherlands is about 3 Bq m-3 (1-10 Bq m-3, depending on the geographical location). The average exposure to radon daughters in the Netherlands corresponds to a lung cancer mortality of 60 (uncertainty interval: 30-120) per million persons per year (80% resulting from Rn-222 and 20% from Rn-220). Knowledge of radon in the Netherlands is still incomplete. Research into Rn-222 exposures in office buildings, factories, schools and day nurseries, and additional field test of the effectiveness of radon control measures are recommended. As knowledge of Rn-220 exposures is virtually non-existent, exploratory research is also recommended.<br>
dc.description.sponsorshipDGM/SVS
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.format.extent160 p
dc.format.extent6765 kb
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM
dc.relation.ispartofRIVM Rapport 710401021
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/710401021.html
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/710401021.pdf
dc.subject12nl
dc.subjectradonnl
dc.subjectthoronnl
dc.subjectradioactiviteitnl
dc.subjectbronnl
dc.subjectemissienl
dc.subjectverspreiding; toxiciteitnl
dc.subjectblootstellingnl
dc.subjectgezondheidnl
dc.subjecteffectnl
dc.subjectmilieunl
dc.subjectrisico; normnl
dc.subjectgrenswaardenl
dc.subjectanalysenl
dc.subjectmodelnl
dc.subjectmaatregelnl
dc.subjecteconomienl
dc.subjectscenario; reviewnl
dc.subjectbinnenmilieunl
dc.subjectwoningnl
dc.subjectbodemnl
dc.subjectbouwmateriaalnl
dc.subjectradonen
dc.subjectthoronen
dc.subjectradioactivityen
dc.subjectsourcesen
dc.subjectemissionen
dc.subjectexposureen
dc.subjecttoxicityen
dc.subjecthealth effectsen
dc.subjectenvironmenten
dc.subjectrisk analysisen
dc.subjectstandardsen
dc.subjectlimitsen
dc.subjectmodellingen
dc.subjectmeasuresen
dc.subjecteconomyen
dc.subjectscenarioen
dc.subjectreviewen
dc.subjectindoor environmenten
dc.subjectdwellingsen
dc.subjectsoilen
dc.subjectbuilding materialsen
dc.subjectrn-220en
dc.subjectrn-222en
dc.subjectdochterproduktenen
dc.titleIntegrated Criteria Document Radonen
dc.title.alternative[Basisdocument Radon.]nl
dc.typeReport
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T18:35:55Z
refterms.dateFOA2019-02-21T08:41:31Z
html.description.abstractThis document on the subject of radon contains data on sources, emissions, dispersion and risks. Risks are based on a comparison of exposure levels and detrimental effects. The main risk to humans from radon is the induction of lung cancer. Possible techniques to reduce these risks, as well as the costs involved, are discussed. A number of potential policy scenarios for radon are also examined. The mean Rn-222 concentration in Dutch living rooms is 29 Bq m-3 (range 8-140 Bq m-3), which falls within the range of 20-90 Bq m-3 observed in other European countries. The soil (averaging about 70%) and the building materials used (about 30%) are the principal contributors to the Rn-222 concentrations in indoor air. The mean outdoor atmospheric concentrations in the Netherlands is about 3 Bq m-3 (1-10 Bq m-3, depending on the geographical location). The average exposure to radon daughters in the Netherlands corresponds to a lung cancer mortality of 60 (uncertainty interval: 30-120) per million persons per year (80% resulting from Rn-222 and 20% from Rn-220). Knowledge of radon in the Netherlands is still incomplete. Research into Rn-222 exposures in office buildings, factories, schools and day nurseries, and additional field test of the effectiveness of radon control measures are recommended. As knowledge of Rn-220 exposures is virtually non-existent, exploratory research is also recommended.&lt;br&gt;


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