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dc.contributor.authorElzen MGJ den
dc.contributor.authorRotmans J
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T23:53:43Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T23:53:43Z
dc.date.issued1991-08-31
dc.identifier222901006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/262321
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
dc.description.abstractWithin the carbon cycle feedback mechanisms that amplify or damp the exchange of carbon dioxide between the different reservoirs to enhanced concentrations of carbon dioxide and increased temperature from anthropogenic perturbations play a crucial role. Quite a lot of these feedbacks are known, but most of them only potentially. This report evaluates the role of a number of these feedback processes within the carbon cycle. In order to assess their impact the feedbacks which at present can be quantified reasonably are built into the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect: IMAGE. Contrary to previous studies, this study describes the scenario- and time dependent role of biogeochemical feedbacks. A number of simulation experiments are performed with IMAGE to make future projections of the concentration of carbon dioxide. Key principle in this is that we use the modelled feedbacks to balance the past and present carbon budget. This results in substantially lower projections for atmospheric carbon dioxide than the IPCC-estimates: for the IPCC 'Business-as-Usual' scenario the difference is about 9%. Besides estimates of their absolute importance, also the relative importance of individual biogeochemical feedbacks is considered, by calculating the gain for each feedback process. Finally the total gain is calculated, which appears to be negative, caused by the dominant role of the fertilization feedback.
dc.description.sponsorshipDGM/L
dc.format.extent32 p
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofRIVM Rapport 222901006
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/222901006.html
dc.subject12nl
dc.subject91-3nl
dc.subjectterugkoppelingsmechanismennl
dc.subjectkoolstofcyclusnl
dc.subjectkoolstofbudgetnl
dc.subjectimage; klimaatsveranderingennl
dc.subjectfeedback mechanismsnl
dc.subjectcarbon cyclenl
dc.subjectcarbon budgetnl
dc.subjectimagenl
dc.subjectclimate changenl
dc.titleModelling feedback mechanisms in the carbon cycle: balancing the carbon budgeten
dc.title.alternativeDe modellering van terugkoppelingsmechanismen in de koolstofcyclus: het in balans brengen van het koolstofbudgetnl
dc.typeReport
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T23:53:43Z
html.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
html.description.abstractWithin the carbon cycle feedback mechanisms that amplify or damp the exchange of carbon dioxide between the different reservoirs to enhanced concentrations of carbon dioxide and increased temperature from anthropogenic perturbations play a crucial role. Quite a lot of these feedbacks are known, but most of them only potentially. This report evaluates the role of a number of these feedback processes within the carbon cycle. In order to assess their impact the feedbacks which at present can be quantified reasonably are built into the Integrated Model to Assess the Greenhouse Effect: IMAGE. Contrary to previous studies, this study describes the scenario- and time dependent role of biogeochemical feedbacks. A number of simulation experiments are performed with IMAGE to make future projections of the concentration of carbon dioxide. Key principle in this is that we use the modelled feedbacks to balance the past and present carbon budget. This results in substantially lower projections for atmospheric carbon dioxide than the IPCC-estimates: for the IPCC 'Business-as-Usual' scenario the difference is about 9%. Besides estimates of their absolute importance, also the relative importance of individual biogeochemical feedbacks is considered, by calculating the gain for each feedback process. Finally the total gain is calculated, which appears to be negative, caused by the dominant role of the fertilization feedback.


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