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dc.contributor.authorDaalen CE van
dc.contributor.authorThissen WAH
dc.contributor.authorBerk MM
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-12T23:55:39Z
dc.date.available2012-12-12T23:55:39Z
dc.date.issued1998-12-30
dc.identifier410200017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/262345
dc.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
dc.description.abstractBetween 1995 and 1997, a series of five workshops, henceforth called the Delft process, took place with the aim to explore and enhance use of the IMAGE 2 model to support international climate negotiations. The IMAGE 2 model is a multi-disciplinary, integrated model designed to simulate the dynamics of the global society-biosphere-climate system. The workshops facilitated a dialogue between policy makers and scientists involved in the development and applications of the IMAGE 2 model. In this way, policy makers would benefit from the policy makers on how to improve the policy relevance of the IMAGE 2 model. Participants evaluation at the end of the workshop series showed that participants have used information from the workshop at international negotiation conferences and in preparation of policy documents. The process shows that creating a forum for direct science-policy interactions can be both very useful and productive, and have confirmed the importance of creating an open and consrtuctive atmosphere between policy makers, and between policy makers and analysts, to enhance utilisation of scientific knowledge. Our analysis also suggests that many factors have to be 'in the right position at the right time and place' to achieve such a success, and that it is difficult to prevent the occurrence of biases in processes like this.With respect to modelling, the process has shown the usefulness of simple flexible tools as an interface between policy makers and the scientific community. At the same time, the Delft process confirms the importance of having more thorough and complex models to provide a credible knowledge basis. Linking the development of these types of tools , therefore, seems to be a fruitful way to enhance the supportive role modelling in policy development.
dc.description.sponsorshipRIVM
dc.format.extent72 p
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherDelft Unversity of Technology
dc.publisherFaculty of Technology
dc.publisherPolicy and Management
dc.publisherDelft
dc.publisherThe Netherlands
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Change NOP-NRP report 410200017
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/410200017.html
dc.subject11nl
dc.subjectklimatologienl
dc.subjectklimaatveranderingnl
dc.subjectonderzoeknl
dc.subjectmodellenonderzoeknl
dc.subjectbeleidnl
dc.subjectbeleidsplannennl
dc.subjectclimatologyen
dc.subjectclimatic changesen
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.subjectmodellingen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjectpolicy plansen
dc.subjectimage 2en
dc.subjectpolicy dialogueen
dc.subjectfcccen
dc.titleExperiences with a dialogue process between policy makers and global modellersen
dc.title.alternativeErvaringen van een dialoog tussen beleidsmakers en klimaatwetenschappersnl
dc.typeOnderzoeksrapport
dc.contributor.departmentNOP
dc.date.updated2012-12-12T23:55:39Z
html.description.abstractAbstract niet beschikbaar
html.description.abstractBetween 1995 and 1997, a series of five workshops, henceforth called the Delft process, took place with the aim to explore and enhance use of the IMAGE 2 model to support international climate negotiations. The IMAGE 2 model is a multi-disciplinary, integrated model designed to simulate the dynamics of the global society-biosphere-climate system. The workshops facilitated a dialogue between policy makers and scientists involved in the development and applications of the IMAGE 2 model. In this way, policy makers would benefit from the policy makers on how to improve the policy relevance of the IMAGE 2 model. Participants evaluation at the end of the workshop series showed that participants have used information from the workshop at international negotiation conferences and in preparation of policy documents. The process shows that creating a forum for direct science-policy interactions can be both very useful and productive, and have confirmed the importance of creating an open and consrtuctive atmosphere between policy makers, and between policy makers and analysts, to enhance utilisation of scientific knowledge. Our analysis also suggests that many factors have to be 'in the right position at the right time and place' to achieve such a success, and that it is difficult to prevent the occurrence of biases in processes like this.With respect to modelling, the process has shown the usefulness of simple flexible tools as an interface between policy makers and the scientific community. At the same time, the Delft process confirms the importance of having more thorough and complex models to provide a credible knowledge basis. Linking the development of these types of tools , therefore, seems to be a fruitful way to enhance the supportive role modelling in policy development.


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