• A combination of plasma phospholipid fatty acids and its association with incidence of type 2 diabetes: The EPIC-InterAct case-cohort study.

      Imamura, Fumiaki; Sharp, Stephen J; Koulman, Albert; Schulze, Matthias B; Kröger, Janine; Griffin, Julian L; Huerta, José M; Guevara, Marcela; Sluijs, Ivonne; Agudo, Antonio; et al. (2017-10)
      Combinations of multiple fatty acids may influence cardiometabolic risk more than single fatty acids. The association of a combination of fatty acids with incident type 2 diabetes (T2D) has not been evaluated.
    • Generalizability of a Diabetes-Associated Country-Specific Exploratory Dietary Pattern Is Feasible Across European Populations.

      Jannasch, Franziska; Kröger, Janine; Agnoli, Claudia; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Cayssials, Valerie; Colorado-Yohar, Sandra; Dahm, Christina C; Dow, Courtney; Fagherazzi, Guy; et al. (2019-06-01)
    • Haem iron intake and risk of lung cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

      Ward, Heather A; Whitman, Julia; Muller, David C; Johansson, Mattias; Jakszyn, Paula; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Palli, Domenico; Fanidi, Anouar; Vermeulen, Roel; Tjønneland, Anne; et al. (2018-10-18)
      Epidemiological studies suggest that haem iron, which is found predominantly in red meat and increases endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds, may be positively associated with lung cancer. The objective was to examine the relationship between haem iron intake and lung cancer risk using detailed smoking history data and serum cotinine to control for potential confounding.
    • Heterogeneity of Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors by Anatomical Subsite in 10 European Countries: A Multinational Cohort Study.

      Murphy, Neil; Ward, Heather A; Jenab, Mazda; Rothwell, Joseph A; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Kvaskoff, Marina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; et al. (2018-07-26)
      Colorectal cancer located at different anatomical subsites may have distinct etiologies and risk factors. Previous studies that have examined this hypothesis have yielded inconsistent results, possibly because most have been of insufficient size to identify heterogeneous associations with precision.
    • Measured Adiposity in Relation to Head and Neck Cancer Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

      Ward, Heather A; Wark, Petra A; Muller, David C; Steffen, Annika; Johansson, Mattias; Norat, Teresa; Gunter, Marc J; Overvad, Kim; Dahm, Christina C; Halkjær, Jytte; et al. (2017-06)
      Background: Emerging evidence from cohort studies indicates that adiposity is associated with greater incidence of head and neck cancer. However, most studies have used self-reported anthropometry which is prone to error.Methods: Among 363,094 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC) with measured anthropometry, there were 837 incident cases of head and neck cancer. Head and neck cancer risk was examined in relation to body mass index (BMI) [lean: <22.5 kg/m2, normal weight (reference): 22.5-24.9 kg/m2, overweight 25-29.9 kg/m2, obese: ≥30 kg/m2], waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) using Cox proportional hazards models.Results: Among men, a BMI < 22.5 kg/m2 was associated with higher head and neck cancer risk [HR 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.23-2.12)]; BMI was not associated with head and neck cancer among women. WC and WHR were associated with greater risk of head and neck cancer among women (WC per 5 cm: HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.02-1.15; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.38-1.93). After stratification by smoking status, the association for WHR was present only among smokers (Pinteraction = 0.004). Among men, WC and WHR were associated with head and neck cancer only upon additional adjustment for BMI (WC per 5 cm: HR 1.16; 95% CI, 1.07-1.26; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.21-1.65).Conclusions: Central adiposity, particularly among women, may have a stronger association with head and neck cancer risk than previously estimated.Impact: Strategies to reduce obesity may beneficially impact head and neck cancer incidence. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 895-904. ©2017 AACR.
    • Metabolic Mediators of the Association Between Adult Weight Gain and Colorectal Cancer: Data From the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Cohort.

      Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Fedirko, Veronika; Jenab, Mazda; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Pischon, Tobias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Gunter, Marc J; et al. (2017-05-01)
      Evidence indicates that gaining weight in adult life is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal cancer; however, biological mechanisms that may explain this association remain unclear. We evaluated the mediation effect of 20 different biomarkers on the relationship between adult weight gain and colorectal cancer, using data from a prospective nested case-control study of 452 incident cases diagnosed between 1992 and 2003 and matched within risk sets to 452 controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The proportions of mediated effects (%) were estimated on the basis of differences in percent effect changes in conditional logistic regression models with and without additional adjustment for individual biomarkers. Greater adult weight gain (≥300 g/year vs. <300 g/year) was associated with a higher risk of colon cancer (multivariable-adjusted relative risk = 1.54, 95% confidence interval: 1.07, 2.24) but not rectal cancer (relative risk = 1.07, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 1.66). This association was accounted for mostly by attained waist circumference (reduction of 61%) and by the biomarkers soluble leptin receptor (reduction of 43%) and glycated hemoglobin (reduction of 28%). These novel data suggest that the observed association between adult weight gain and colon cancer could be primarily explained by attained abdominal fatness and biomarkers of metabolic dysfunction.
    • Nutritional quality of food as represented by the FSAm-NPS nutrient profiling system underlying the Nutri-Score label and cancer risk in Europe: Results from the EPIC prospective cohort study.

      Deschasaux, Mélanie; Huybrechts, Inge; Murphy, Neil; Julia, Chantal; Hercberg, Serge; Srour, Bernard; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Latino-Martel, Paule; Biessy, Carine; Casagrande, Corinne; et al. (2018-09)
      Helping consumers make healthier food choices is a key issue for the prevention of cancer and other diseases. In many countries, political authorities are considering the implementation of a simplified labelling system to reflect the nutritional quality of food products. The Nutri-Score, a five-colour nutrition label, is derived from the Nutrient Profiling System of the British Food Standards Agency (modified version) (FSAm-NPS). How the consumption of foods with high/low FSAm-NPS relates to cancer risk has been studied in national/regional cohorts but has not been characterized in diverse European populations.
    • Physical activity, mediating factors and risk of colon cancer: insights into adiposity and circulating biomarkers from the EPIC cohort.

      Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Jenab, Mazda; Leitzmann, Michael; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Bamia, Christina; Lagiou, Pagona; Rinaldi, Sabina; Freisling, Heinz; et al. (2017-12-01)
      There is convincing evidence that high physical activity lowers the risk of colon cancer; however, the underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. We aimed to determine the extent to which body fatness and biomarkers of various biologically plausible pathways account for the association between physical activity and colon cancer.
    • Risk prediction for estrogen receptor-specific breast cancers in two large prospective cohorts.

      Li, Kuanrong; Anderson, Garnet; Viallon, Vivian; Arveux, Patrick; Kvaskoff, Marina; Fournier, Agnès; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Sánchez, Maria-Jose; Ardanaz, Eva; et al. (2018-12-03)
      Few published breast cancer (BC) risk prediction models consider the heterogeneity of predictor variables between estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) and negative (ER-) tumors. Using data from two large cohorts, we examined whether modeling this heterogeneity could improve prediction. We built two models, for ER+ (Model Parity, number of full-term pregnancies, age at first full-term pregnancy and body height were only associated with ER+ tumors. Menopausal status, age at menarche and at menopause, hormone replacement therapy, postmenopausal body mass index, and alcohol intake were homogeneously associated with ER+ and ER- tumors. Internal validation yielded a C-statistic of 0.64 for Model Modeling heterogeneous epidemiological risk factors might yield little improvement in BC risk prediction. Nevertheless, a model specifically predictive of ER+ tumor risk could be more applicable than an omnibus model in risk assessment for chemoprevention.
    • Risk thresholds for alcohol consumption: combined analysis of individual-participant data for 599 912 current drinkers in 83 prospective studies.

      Wood, Angela M; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S; Willeit, Peter; Warnakula, Samantha; Bolton, Thomas; Paige, Ellie; Paul, Dirk S; Sweeting, Michael; Burgess, Stephen; et al. (2018)
      Low-risk limits recommended for alcohol consumption vary substantially across different national guidelines. To define thresholds associated with lowest risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease, we studied individual-participant data from 599 912 current drinkers without previous cardiovascular disease.