• Does early onset asthma increase childhood obesity risk? A pooled analysis of 16 European cohorts.

      Contreras, Zuelma A; Chen, Zhanghua; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baïz, Nour; von Berg, Andrea; Bergström, Anna; Crozier, Sarah; Duijts, Liesbeth; Ekström, Sandra; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria P; Kjaer, Henrik Fomsgaard; Forastiere, Francesco; Gerhard, Beatrix; Gori, Davide; Harskamp-van Ginkel, Margreet W; Heinrich, Joachim; Iñiguez, Carmen; Inskip, Hazel; Keil, Thomas; Kogevinas, Manolis; Lau, Susanne; Lehmann, Irina; Maier, Dieter; van Meel, Evelien R; Mommers, Monique; Murcia, Mario; Porta, Daniela; Smit, Henriëtte A; Standl, Marie; Stratakis, Nikos; Sunyer, Jordi; Thijs, Carel; Torrent, Maties; Vrijkotte, Tanja G M; Wijga, Alet H; Berhane, Kiros; Gilliland, Frank; Chatzi, Leda (2018-09)
      The parallel epidemics of childhood asthma and obesity over the past few decades have spurred research into obesity as a risk factor for asthma. However, little is known regarding the role of asthma in obesity incidence. We examined whether early-onset asthma and related phenotypes are associated with the risk of developing obesity in childhood.This study includes 21 130 children born from 1990 to 2008 in Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK. We followed non-obese children at 3-4 years of age for incident obesity up to 8 years of age. Physician-diagnosed asthma, wheezing and allergic rhinitis were assessed up to 3-4 years of age.Children with physician-diagnosed asthma had a higher risk for incident obesity than those without asthma (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.66, 95% CI 1.18-2.33). Children with active asthma (wheeze in the last 12 months and physician-diagnosed asthma) exhibited a higher risk for obesity (aHR 1.98, 95% CI 1.31-3.00) than those without wheeze and asthma. Persistent wheezing was associated with increased risk for incident obesity compared to never wheezers (aHR 1.51, 95% CI 1.08-2.09).Early-onset asthma and wheezing may contribute to an increased risk of developing obesity in later childhood.
    • Integrating Clinical and Epidemiologic Data on Allergic Diseases Across Birth Cohorts: A Harmonization Study in the Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy Project.

      Benet, Marta; Albang, Richard; Pinart, Mariona; Hohmann, Cynthia; Tischer, Christina G; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baïz, Nour; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Cirugeda, Lourdes; Eller, Esben; Fantini, Maria Pia; Gehring, Ulrike; Gerhard, Beatrix; Gori, Davide; Hallner, Eva; Kull, Inger; Lenzi, Jacopo; McEachan, Rosemary; Minina, Eleonora; Momas, Isabelle; Narduzzi, Silvia; Petherick, Emily S; Porta, Daniela; Rancière, Fanny; Standl, Marie; Torrent, Maties; Wijga, Alet H; Wright, John; Kogevinas, Manolis; Guerra, Stefano; Sunyer, Jordi; Keil, Thomas; Bousquet, Jean; Maier, Dieter; Anto, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith (2019-02-01)
      The numbers of international collaborations among birth cohort studies designed to better understand asthma and allergies have increased in the last several years. However, differences in definitions and methods preclude direct pooling of original data on individual participants. As part of the Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL) Project, we harmonized data from 14 birth cohort studies (each with 3-20 follow-up periods) carried out in 9 European countries during 1990-1998 or 2003-2009. The harmonization process followed 6 steps: 1) organization of the harmonization panel; 2) identification of variables relevant to MeDALL objectives (candidate variables); 3) proposal of a definition for each candidate variable (reference definition); 4) assessment of the compatibility of each cohort variable with its reference definition (inferential equivalence) and classification of this inferential equivalence as complete, partial, or impossible; 5) convocation of a workshop to agree on the reference definitions and classifications of inferential equivalence; and 6) preparation and delivery of data through a knowledge management portal. We agreed on 137 reference definitions. The inferential equivalence of 3,551 cohort variables to their corresponding reference definitions was classified as complete, partial, and impossible for 70%, 15%, and 15% of the variables, respectively. A harmonized database was delivered to MeDALL investigators. In asthma and allergy birth cohorts, the harmonization of data for pooled analyses is feasible, and high inferential comparability may be achieved. The MeDALL harmonization approach can be used in other collaborative projects.