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dc.contributor.authorBoot, Hein J
dc.contributor.authorMelker, Hester E de
dc.contributor.authorStolk, Elly A
dc.contributor.authorWit, G Ardine de
dc.contributor.authorKimman, Tjeerd G
dc.date.accessioned2006-10-26T09:55:12Z
dc.date.available2006-10-26T09:55:12Z
dc.date.issued2006-09-11
dc.identifier.citationVaccine 2006, 24(37-39):6288-99en
dc.identifier.issn0264-410X
dc.identifier.pmid16790302
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2006.05.071
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/5600
dc.description.abstractAlthough varicella is seen as a benign disease in the Netherlands, about 40,000 visits to a general practitioner (GP) are made, over 200 hospital admission occur, and 2.3 persons die on average each year. Most of this burden of disease can be prevented by universal varicella childhood vaccination. Ten years after the introduction of the single-shot, single-component varicella childhood vaccination in the USA, a major reduction in hospitalization, mortality, and burden of disease has been reported. Using our recently vaccine evaluation model for the introduction of a new vaccine in our national immunization program, we have analyzed the feasibility of universal varicella vaccination by replacing the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine with a measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine. After structuring and reviewing the available data, two major points of uncertainty remain: (1) the influence of universal childhood vaccination on the incidence of zoster later in life; (2) the cost-effectiveness ratio for the Dutch situation. Despite these uncertainties it is clear that universal childhood vaccination will prevent most of the varicella related GP-visits, hospitalizations, and deaths.
dc.format.extent167807 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleAssessing the introduction of universal varicella vaccination in the Netherlands.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T13:44:34Z
html.description.abstractAlthough varicella is seen as a benign disease in the Netherlands, about 40,000 visits to a general practitioner (GP) are made, over 200 hospital admission occur, and 2.3 persons die on average each year. Most of this burden of disease can be prevented by universal varicella childhood vaccination. Ten years after the introduction of the single-shot, single-component varicella childhood vaccination in the USA, a major reduction in hospitalization, mortality, and burden of disease has been reported. Using our recently vaccine evaluation model for the introduction of a new vaccine in our national immunization program, we have analyzed the feasibility of universal varicella vaccination by replacing the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine with a measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine. After structuring and reviewing the available data, two major points of uncertainty remain: (1) the influence of universal childhood vaccination on the incidence of zoster later in life; (2) the cost-effectiveness ratio for the Dutch situation. Despite these uncertainties it is clear that universal childhood vaccination will prevent most of the varicella related GP-visits, hospitalizations, and deaths.


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