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dc.contributor.authorvan Pomeren, M
dc.contributor.authorBrun, N R
dc.contributor.authorPeijnenburg, W J G M
dc.contributor.authorVijver, M G
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-03T12:44:27Z
dc.date.available2018-01-03T12:44:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.citationExploring uptake and biodistribution of polystyrene (nano)particles in zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages. 2017, 190:40-45 Aquat. Toxicol.en
dc.identifier.issn1879-1514
dc.identifier.pmid28686897
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.aquatox.2017.06.017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/620991
dc.description.abstractIn ecotoxicology, it is continuously questioned whether (nano)particle exposure results in particle uptake and subsequent biodistribution or if particles adsorb to the epithelial layer only. To contribute to answering this question, we investigated different uptake routes in zebrafish embryos and how they affect particle uptake into organs and within whole organisms. This is addressed by exposing three different life stages of the zebrafish embryo in order to cover the following exposure routes: via chorion and dermal exposure; dermal exposure; oral and dermal exposure. How different nanoparticle sizes affect uptake routes was assessed by using polystyrene particles of 25, 50, 250 and 700nm. In our experimental study, we showed that particle uptake in biota is restricted to oral exposure, whereas the dermal route resulted in adsorption to the epidermis and gills only. Ingestion followed by biodistribution was observed for the tested particles of 25 and 50nm. The particles spread through the body and eventually accumulated in specific organs and tissues such as the eyes. Particles larger than 50nm were predominantly adsorbed onto the intestinal tract and outer epidermis of zebrafish embryos. Embryos exposed to particles via both epidermis and intestine showed highest uptake and eventually accumulated particles in the eye, whereas uptake of particles via the chorion and epidermis resulted in marginal uptake. Organ uptake and internal distribution should be monitored more closely to provide more in depth information of the toxicity of particles.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Aquatic toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)en
dc.subject.meshAdsorption
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshEcotoxicology
dc.subject.meshEmbryo, Nonmammalian
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic Development
dc.subject.meshGills
dc.subject.meshNanoparticles
dc.subject.meshParticle Size
dc.subject.meshPolystyrenes
dc.subject.meshTissue Distribution
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemical
dc.subject.meshZebrafish
dc.titleExploring uptake and biodistribution of polystyrene (nano)particles in zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAquat Toxicol 2017, 190:40-5en
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T13:56:40Z
html.description.abstractIn ecotoxicology, it is continuously questioned whether (nano)particle exposure results in particle uptake and subsequent biodistribution or if particles adsorb to the epithelial layer only. To contribute to answering this question, we investigated different uptake routes in zebrafish embryos and how they affect particle uptake into organs and within whole organisms. This is addressed by exposing three different life stages of the zebrafish embryo in order to cover the following exposure routes: via chorion and dermal exposure; dermal exposure; oral and dermal exposure. How different nanoparticle sizes affect uptake routes was assessed by using polystyrene particles of 25, 50, 250 and 700nm. In our experimental study, we showed that particle uptake in biota is restricted to oral exposure, whereas the dermal route resulted in adsorption to the epidermis and gills only. Ingestion followed by biodistribution was observed for the tested particles of 25 and 50nm. The particles spread through the body and eventually accumulated in specific organs and tissues such as the eyes. Particles larger than 50nm were predominantly adsorbed onto the intestinal tract and outer epidermis of zebrafish embryos. Embryos exposed to particles via both epidermis and intestine showed highest uptake and eventually accumulated particles in the eye, whereas uptake of particles via the chorion and epidermis resulted in marginal uptake. Organ uptake and internal distribution should be monitored more closely to provide more in depth information of the toxicity of particles.


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