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dc.contributor.authorTe Beest, Dennis E
dc.contributor.authorde Bruin, Erwin
dc.contributor.authorImholz, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorKoopmans, Marion
dc.contributor.authorvan Boven, Michiel
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-04T11:54:01Z
dc.date.available2018-01-04T11:54:01Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationHeterosubtypic cross-reactivity of HA1 antibodies to influenza A, with emphasis on nonhuman subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, H9N2). 2017, 12 (7):e0181093 PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.pmid28715468
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0181093
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621020
dc.description.abstractEpidemics of influenza A vary greatly in size and age distribution of cases, and this variation is attributed to varying levels of pre-existing immunity. Recent studies have shown that antibody-mediated immune responses are more cross-reactive than previously believed, and shape patterns of humoral immunity to influenza A viruses over long periods. Here we quantify antibody responses to the hemagglutinin subunit 1 (HA1) across a range of subtypes using protein microarray analysis of cross-sectional serological surveys carried out in the Netherlands before and after the A/2009 (H1N1) pandemic. We find significant associations of responses, both within and between subtypes. Interestingly, substantial overall reactivity is observed to HA1 of avian H7N7 and H9N2 viruses. Seroprevalence of H7N7 correlates with antibody titers to A/1968 (H3N2), and is highest in persons born between 1954 and 1969. Seroprevalence of H9N2 is high across all ages, and correlates strongly with A/1957 (H2N2). This correlation is most pronounced in A/2009 (H1N1) infected persons born after 1968 who have never encountered A/1957 (H2N2)-like viruses. We conclude that heterosubtypic antibody cross-reactivity, both between human subtypes and between human and nonhuman subtypes, is common in the human population.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PloS oneen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral
dc.subject.meshBirds
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshCross Reactions
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H7N7 Subtype
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H9N2 Subtype
dc.subject.meshInfluenza in Birds
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleHeterosubtypic cross-reactivity of HA1 antibodies to influenza A, with emphasis on nonhuman subtypes (H5N1, H7N7, H9N2).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPlos One 2017, 12(7):e0181093en
html.description.abstractEpidemics of influenza A vary greatly in size and age distribution of cases, and this variation is attributed to varying levels of pre-existing immunity. Recent studies have shown that antibody-mediated immune responses are more cross-reactive than previously believed, and shape patterns of humoral immunity to influenza A viruses over long periods. Here we quantify antibody responses to the hemagglutinin subunit 1 (HA1) across a range of subtypes using protein microarray analysis of cross-sectional serological surveys carried out in the Netherlands before and after the A/2009 (H1N1) pandemic. We find significant associations of responses, both within and between subtypes. Interestingly, substantial overall reactivity is observed to HA1 of avian H7N7 and H9N2 viruses. Seroprevalence of H7N7 correlates with antibody titers to A/1968 (H3N2), and is highest in persons born between 1954 and 1969. Seroprevalence of H9N2 is high across all ages, and correlates strongly with A/1957 (H2N2). This correlation is most pronounced in A/2009 (H1N1) infected persons born after 1968 who have never encountered A/1957 (H2N2)-like viruses. We conclude that heterosubtypic antibody cross-reactivity, both between human subtypes and between human and nonhuman subtypes, is common in the human population.


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