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dc.contributor.authorHullmann, Maja
dc.contributor.authorAlbrecht, Catrin
dc.contributor.authorvan Berlo, Damiën
dc.contributor.authorGerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E
dc.contributor.authorWahle, Tina
dc.contributor.authorBoots, Agnes W
dc.contributor.authorKrutmann, Jean
dc.contributor.authorCassee, Flemming R
dc.contributor.authorBayer, Thomas A
dc.contributor.authorSchins, Roel P F
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-09T13:20:54Z
dc.date.available2018-01-09T13:20:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-30
dc.identifier.citationDiesel engine exhaust accelerates plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. 2017, 14 (1):35 Part Fibre Toxicolen
dc.identifier.issn1743-8977
dc.identifier.pmid28854940
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12989-017-0213-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621086
dc.description.abstractIncreasing evidence from toxicological and epidemiological studies indicates that the central nervous system is an important target for ambient air pollutants. We have investigated whether long-term inhalation exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a dominant contributor to particulate air pollution in urban environments, can aggravate Alzheimer's Disease (AD)-like effects in female 5X Familial AD (5XFAD) mice and their wild-type female littermates. Following 3 and 13 weeks exposures to diluted DEE (0.95 mg/m3, 6 h/day, 5 days/week) or clean air (controls) behaviour tests were performed and amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque formation, pulmonary histopathology and systemic inflammation were evaluated.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Particle and fibre toxicologyen
dc.titleDiesel engine exhaust accelerates plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPart Fibre toxicol 2017, 14(1):35en
html.description.abstractIncreasing evidence from toxicological and epidemiological studies indicates that the central nervous system is an important target for ambient air pollutants. We have investigated whether long-term inhalation exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a dominant contributor to particulate air pollution in urban environments, can aggravate Alzheimer's Disease (AD)-like effects in female 5X Familial AD (5XFAD) mice and their wild-type female littermates. Following 3 and 13 weeks exposures to diluted DEE (0.95 mg/m3, 6 h/day, 5 days/week) or clean air (controls) behaviour tests were performed and amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque formation, pulmonary histopathology and systemic inflammation were evaluated.


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