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dc.contributor.authorRaeven, R Hm
dc.contributor.authorBrummelman, J
dc.contributor.authorPennings, J LA
dc.contributor.authorvan der Maas, L
dc.contributor.authorHelm, K
dc.contributor.authorTilstra, W
dc.contributor.authorvan der Ark, A
dc.contributor.authorSloots, A
dc.contributor.authorvan der Ley, P
dc.contributor.authorvan Eden, W
dc.contributor.authorJiskoot, W
dc.contributor.authorvan Riet, E
dc.contributor.authorvan Els, C Acm
dc.contributor.authorKersten, G Fa
dc.contributor.authorHan, W Gh
dc.contributor.authorMetz, B
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-10T07:54:28Z
dc.date.available2018-01-10T07:54:28Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-20
dc.identifier.citationMolecular and cellular signatures underlying superior immunity against Bordetella pertussis upon pulmonary vaccination. 2017 Mucosal Immunolen
dc.identifier.issn1935-3456
dc.identifier.pmid28930286
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/mi.2017.81
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621123
dc.description.abstractMucosal immunity is often required for protection against respiratory pathogens but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of induction remain poorly understood. Here, systems vaccinology was used to identify immune signatures after pulmonary or subcutaneous immunization of mice with pertussis outer membrane vesicles. Pulmonary immunization led to improved protection, exclusively induced mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and T helper type 17 (Th17) responses, and in addition evoked elevated systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels, IgG-producing plasma cells, memory B cells, and Th17 cells. These adaptive responses were preceded by unique local expression of genes of the innate immune response related to Th17 (e.g., Rorc) and IgA responses (e.g., Pigr) in addition to local and systemic secretion of Th1/Th17-promoting cytokines. This comprehensive systems approach identifies the effect of the administration route on the development of mucosal immunity, its importance in protection against Bordetella pertussis, and reveals potential molecular correlates of vaccine immunity to this reemerging pathogen.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 20 September 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.81.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Mucosal immunologyen
dc.titleMolecular and cellular signatures underlying superior immunity against Bordetella pertussis upon pulmonary vaccination.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMucosal Immunol 2017, advance online publication (ahead of print)en
html.description.abstractMucosal immunity is often required for protection against respiratory pathogens but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of induction remain poorly understood. Here, systems vaccinology was used to identify immune signatures after pulmonary or subcutaneous immunization of mice with pertussis outer membrane vesicles. Pulmonary immunization led to improved protection, exclusively induced mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and T helper type 17 (Th17) responses, and in addition evoked elevated systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels, IgG-producing plasma cells, memory B cells, and Th17 cells. These adaptive responses were preceded by unique local expression of genes of the innate immune response related to Th17 (e.g., Rorc) and IgA responses (e.g., Pigr) in addition to local and systemic secretion of Th1/Th17-promoting cytokines. This comprehensive systems approach identifies the effect of the administration route on the development of mucosal immunity, its importance in protection against Bordetella pertussis, and reveals potential molecular correlates of vaccine immunity to this reemerging pathogen.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 20 September 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2017.81.


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