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dc.contributor.authorvan Duijkeren, Engeline
dc.contributor.authorSchink, Anne-Kathrin
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Marilyn C
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yang
dc.contributor.authorSchwarz, Stefan
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-16T09:00:47Z
dc.date.available2018-01-16T09:00:47Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.identifier.citationMechanisms of Bacterial Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents. 2018, 6 (1) Microbiol Spectren
dc.identifier.issn2165-0497
dc.identifier.pmid29327680
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/microbiolspec.ARBA-0019-2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621153
dc.description.abstractDuring the past decades resistance to virtually all antimicrobial agents has been observed in bacteria of animal origin. This chapter describes in detail the mechanisms so far encountered for the various classes of antimicrobial agents. The main mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation by either disintegration or chemical modification of antimicrobial agents, reduced intracellular accumulation by either decreased influx or increased efflux of antimicrobial agents, and modifications at the cellular target sites (i.e., mutational changes, chemical modification, protection, or even replacement of the target sites). Often several mechanisms interact to enhance bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents. This is a completely revised version of the corresponding chapter in the book Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacteria of Animal Origin published in 2006. New sections have been added for oxazolidinones, polypeptides, mupirocin, ansamycins, fosfomycin, fusidic acid, and streptomycins, and the chapters for the remaining classes of antimicrobial agents have been completely updated to cover the advances in knowledge gained since 2006.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen
dc.titleMechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMicrobiol Spectr 2018; 6(1)en
html.description.abstractDuring the past decades resistance to virtually all antimicrobial agents has been observed in bacteria of animal origin. This chapter describes in detail the mechanisms so far encountered for the various classes of antimicrobial agents. The main mechanisms include enzymatic inactivation by either disintegration or chemical modification of antimicrobial agents, reduced intracellular accumulation by either decreased influx or increased efflux of antimicrobial agents, and modifications at the cellular target sites (i.e., mutational changes, chemical modification, protection, or even replacement of the target sites). Often several mechanisms interact to enhance bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents. This is a completely revised version of the corresponding chapter in the book Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacteria of Animal Origin published in 2006. New sections have been added for oxazolidinones, polypeptides, mupirocin, ansamycins, fosfomycin, fusidic acid, and streptomycins, and the chapters for the remaining classes of antimicrobial agents have been completely updated to cover the advances in knowledge gained since 2006.


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