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dc.contributor.authorvan Bree, Freek P J
dc.contributor.authorBokken, Gertie C A M
dc.contributor.authorMineur, Robin
dc.contributor.authorFranssen, Frits
dc.contributor.authorOpsteegh, Marieke
dc.contributor.authorvan der Giessen, Joke W B
dc.contributor.authorLipman, Len J A
dc.contributor.authorOvergaauw, Paul A M
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-16T09:02:32Z
dc.date.available2018-01-16T09:02:32Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-13
dc.identifier.citationZoonotic bacteria and parasites found in raw meat-based diets for cats and dogs. 2018, 182 (2):50 Vet. Rec.en
dc.identifier.issn2042-7670
dc.identifier.pmid29326391
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/vr.104535
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621154
dc.description.abstractFeeding raw meat-based diets (RMBDs) to companion animals has become increasingly popular. Since these diets may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, they may pose a risk to both animal and human health. The purpose of this study was to test for the presence of zoonotic bacterial and parasitic pathogens in Dutch commercial RMBDs. We analysed 35 commercial frozen RMBDs from eight different brands. Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 was isolated from eight products (23 per cent) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases-producing E coli was found in 28 products (80 per cent). Listeria monocytogenes was present in 19 products (54 per cent), other Listeria species in 15 products (43 per cent) and Salmonella species in seven products (20 per cent). Concerning parasites, four products (11 per cent) contained Sarcocystis cruzi and another four (11 per cent) S tenella In two products (6 per cent) Toxoplasma gondii was found. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of potential zoonotic pathogens in frozen RMBDs that may be a possible source of bacterial infections in pet animals and if transmitted pose a risk for human beings. If non-frozen meat is fed, parasitic infections are also possible. Pet owners should therefore be informed about the risks associated with feeding their animals RMBDs.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen
dc.titleZoonotic bacteria and parasites found in raw meat-based diets for cats and dogs.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalVet Rec 2018; 182(2):50en
html.description.abstractFeeding raw meat-based diets (RMBDs) to companion animals has become increasingly popular. Since these diets may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, they may pose a risk to both animal and human health. The purpose of this study was to test for the presence of zoonotic bacterial and parasitic pathogens in Dutch commercial RMBDs. We analysed 35 commercial frozen RMBDs from eight different brands. Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 was isolated from eight products (23 per cent) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases-producing E coli was found in 28 products (80 per cent). Listeria monocytogenes was present in 19 products (54 per cent), other Listeria species in 15 products (43 per cent) and Salmonella species in seven products (20 per cent). Concerning parasites, four products (11 per cent) contained Sarcocystis cruzi and another four (11 per cent) S tenella In two products (6 per cent) Toxoplasma gondii was found. The results of this study demonstrate the presence of potential zoonotic pathogens in frozen RMBDs that may be a possible source of bacterial infections in pet animals and if transmitted pose a risk for human beings. If non-frozen meat is fed, parasitic infections are also possible. Pet owners should therefore be informed about the risks associated with feeding their animals RMBDs.


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