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dc.contributor.authorVerkaik-Kloosterman, Janneke
dc.contributor.authorBuurma-Rethans, Elly J M
dc.contributor.authorDekkers, Arnold L M
dc.contributor.authorvan Rossum, Caroline T M
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-24T11:24:56Z
dc.date.available2018-01-24T11:24:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-04
dc.identifier.citationDecreased, but still sufficient, iodine intake of children and adults in the Netherlands. 2017, 117 (7):1020-1031 Br. J. Nutr.en
dc.identifier.issn1475-2662
dc.identifier.pmid28516817
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0007114517000733
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621238
dc.description.abstractSufficient I intake is important for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which play an important role in normal growth and development. Our aim was to estimate habitual I intake for the Dutch population and the risk of inadequate or excessive intakes. Further, we aimed to provide an insight into the dietary sources of I and the association with socio-demographic factors. Data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010 (n 3819; 7-69 years), and from the Dutch food and supplement composition tables were used to estimate habitual I intake with a calculation model. Contribution of food groups to I intake were computed and multiple linear regression was used to examine associations of intakes with socio-demographic factors. A total of ≤2 % of the population had an intake below the estimated average requirement or above the upper level. The main sources of I were bread containing iodised salt (39 %), dairy products (14 %) and non-alcoholic drinks (6 %). I intake (natural sources only, excluding iodised salt and supplements) was positively associated with (parental) education, which could at least partly be attributed to a higher consumption of dairy products. Among children, the consumption of bread, often containing iodised bakery salt, was positively associated with parental education. The I intake of the Dutch population (7-69 years) seems adequate, although it has decreased since the period before 2008. With the current effort to reduce salt intake and changing dietary patterns (i.e. less bread, more organic foods) it is important to keep a close track on the I status, important sources and potential risk groups.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of nutritionen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBread
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subject.meshDairy Products
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factual
dc.subject.meshDeficiency Diseases
dc.subject.meshDiet
dc.subject.meshFood, Fortified
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIodine
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNetherlands
dc.subject.meshNutrition Surveys
dc.subject.meshNutritive Value
dc.subject.meshRisk
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleDecreased, but still sufficient, iodine intake of children and adults in the Netherlands.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBr J Nutr 2017; 117(7):1020-31en
html.description.abstractSufficient I intake is important for the synthesis of thyroid hormones, which play an important role in normal growth and development. Our aim was to estimate habitual I intake for the Dutch population and the risk of inadequate or excessive intakes. Further, we aimed to provide an insight into the dietary sources of I and the association with socio-demographic factors. Data from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010 (n 3819; 7-69 years), and from the Dutch food and supplement composition tables were used to estimate habitual I intake with a calculation model. Contribution of food groups to I intake were computed and multiple linear regression was used to examine associations of intakes with socio-demographic factors. A total of ≤2 % of the population had an intake below the estimated average requirement or above the upper level. The main sources of I were bread containing iodised salt (39 %), dairy products (14 %) and non-alcoholic drinks (6 %). I intake (natural sources only, excluding iodised salt and supplements) was positively associated with (parental) education, which could at least partly be attributed to a higher consumption of dairy products. Among children, the consumption of bread, often containing iodised bakery salt, was positively associated with parental education. The I intake of the Dutch population (7-69 years) seems adequate, although it has decreased since the period before 2008. With the current effort to reduce salt intake and changing dietary patterns (i.e. less bread, more organic foods) it is important to keep a close track on the I status, important sources and potential risk groups.


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