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dc.contributor.authorStrak, Maciejen
dc.contributor.authorJanssen, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorBeelen, Roben
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorKarssenberg, Dereken
dc.contributor.authorHouthuijs, Dannyen
dc.contributor.authorvan den Brink, Carolienen
dc.contributor.authorDijst, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorBrunekreef, Berten
dc.contributor.authorHoek, Gerarden
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-29T12:28:21Z
dc.date.available2018-01-29T12:28:21Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationAssociations between lifestyle and air pollution exposure: Potential for confounding in large administrative data cohorts. 2017, 156:364-373 Environ. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn1096-0953
dc.identifier.pmid28395240
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2017.03.050
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621254
dc.description.abstractCohorts based on administrative data have size advantages over individual cohorts in investigating air pollution risks, but often lack in-depth information on individual risk factors related to lifestyle. If there is a correlation between lifestyle and air pollution, omitted lifestyle variables may result in biased air pollution risk estimates. Correlations between lifestyle and air pollution can be induced by socio-economic status affecting both lifestyle and air pollution exposure.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Environmental researchen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLife Style
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMortality
dc.subject.meshNetherlands
dc.subject.meshParticulate Matter
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment
dc.subject.meshSocial Class
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
dc.titleAssociations between lifestyle and air pollution exposure: Potential for confounding in large administrative data cohorts.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEnviron Res 2017; 156:364-73en
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T14:03:21Z
html.description.abstractCohorts based on administrative data have size advantages over individual cohorts in investigating air pollution risks, but often lack in-depth information on individual risk factors related to lifestyle. If there is a correlation between lifestyle and air pollution, omitted lifestyle variables may result in biased air pollution risk estimates. Correlations between lifestyle and air pollution can be induced by socio-economic status affecting both lifestyle and air pollution exposure.


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