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dc.contributor.authorKoster, E M
dc.contributor.authorde Gelder, R
dc.contributor.authorDi Nardo, F
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, G
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, A
dc.contributor.authorvan Buren, L P
dc.contributor.authorLyshol, H
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, L
dc.contributor.authorBirt, C A
dc.contributor.authorHiggerson, J
dc.contributor.authorAchterberg, P W
dc.contributor.authorVerma, A
dc.contributor.authorvan Ameijden, E J C
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-29T13:33:08Z
dc.date.available2018-01-29T13:33:08Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-01
dc.identifier.citationHealth status in Europe: comparison of 24 urban areas to the corresponding 10 countries (EURO-URHIS 2). 2017, 27 (suppl_2):62-67 Eur J Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1464-360X
dc.identifier.pmid28431085
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/eurpub/ckw188
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621268
dc.description.abstract: In Europe, over 70% of the population live in urban areas (UAs). Most international comparative health research is done using national level data, as reliable and comparable urban data are often unavailable or difficult to access. This study aims to investigate whether population health is different in UAs compared with their corresponding countries. : Routinely available health-related data were collected by the EURO-URHIS 2 project, for 10 European countries and for 24 UAs within those countries. National and UA level data for 11 health indicators were compared through the calculation of relative difference, and geographical patterns within Europe were investigated using the Mann Whitney U test. Linear regression modelling was used to adjust for population density, gross domestic product and urbanicity. : In general, the urban population in Eastern Europe is less healthy than the Western European urban population. However, people in Eastern Europe have significantly better broad health outcomes in UAs as compared with the corresponding country as a whole, whereas people in Western Europe have generally worse broader health outcomes in UAs. : For most European countries and UAs that were investigated, the national level health status data does not correspond with the health status at UA level. In order to identify health problems in UAs and to provide information for local health policy, health monitoring and international benchmarking should also be conducted at the local level.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of public healthen
dc.titleHealth status in Europe: comparison of 24 urban areas to the corresponding 10 countries (EURO-URHIS 2).en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEur J Public Health 2017; 27(supp 2):62-7en
html.description.abstract: In Europe, over 70% of the population live in urban areas (UAs). Most international comparative health research is done using national level data, as reliable and comparable urban data are often unavailable or difficult to access. This study aims to investigate whether population health is different in UAs compared with their corresponding countries. : Routinely available health-related data were collected by the EURO-URHIS 2 project, for 10 European countries and for 24 UAs within those countries. National and UA level data for 11 health indicators were compared through the calculation of relative difference, and geographical patterns within Europe were investigated using the Mann Whitney U test. Linear regression modelling was used to adjust for population density, gross domestic product and urbanicity. : In general, the urban population in Eastern Europe is less healthy than the Western European urban population. However, people in Eastern Europe have significantly better broad health outcomes in UAs as compared with the corresponding country as a whole, whereas people in Western Europe have generally worse broader health outcomes in UAs. : For most European countries and UAs that were investigated, the national level health status data does not correspond with the health status at UA level. In order to identify health problems in UAs and to provide information for local health policy, health monitoring and international benchmarking should also be conducted at the local level.


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