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dc.contributor.authorMohran, K A
dc.contributor.authorFarag, E A B
dc.contributor.authorReusken, C B E
dc.contributor.authorRaj, V S
dc.contributor.authorLamers, M M
dc.contributor.authorPas, S D
dc.contributor.authorVoermans, J
dc.contributor.authorSmits, S L
dc.contributor.authorAlhajri, M M
dc.contributor.authorAlhajri, F
dc.contributor.authorAl-Romaihi, H E
dc.contributor.authorGhobashy, H
dc.contributor.authorEl-Maghraby, M M
dc.contributor.authorAl Dhahiry, S H S
dc.contributor.authorAl-Mawlawi, N
dc.contributor.authorEl-Sayed, A M
dc.contributor.authorAl-Thani, M
dc.contributor.authorAl-Marri, S A
dc.contributor.authorHaagmans, B L
dc.contributor.authorKoopmans, M P G
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T08:39:54Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T08:39:54Z
dc.date.issued2016-12
dc.identifier.citationThe sample of choice for detecting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in asymptomatic dromedary camels using real-time reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction. 2016, 35 (3):905-911 Rev. - Off. Int. Epizoot.en
dc.identifier.issn0253-1933
dc.identifier.pmid28332641
dc.identifier.doi10.20506/rst.35.3.2578
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621361
dc.description.abstractThe newly identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which causes severe respiratory disease, particularly in people with comorbidities, requires further investigation. Studies in Qatar and elsewhere have provided evidence that dromedary camels are a reservoir for the virus, but the exact modes of transmission of MERS-CoV to humans remain unclear. In February 2014, an assessment was made of the suitability and sensitivity of different types of sample for the detection of MERSCoV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for three gene targets: UpE (upstream of the E gene), the N (nucleocapsid) gene and open reading frame (ORF) 1a. Fifty-three animals presented for slaughter were sampled. A high percentage of the sampled camels (79% [95% confidence interval 66.9-91.5%, standard error 0.0625]; 42 out of 53) were shown to be shedding MERS-CoV at the time of slaughter, yet all the animals were apparently healthy. Among the virus-positive animals, nasal swabs were most often positive (97.6%). Oral swabs were the second most frequently positive (35.7%), followed by rectal swabs (28.5%). In addition, the highest viral load, expressed as a cycle threshold (Ct) value of 11.27, was obtained from a nasal swab. These findings lead to the conclusion that nasal swabs are the candidate sample of choice for detecting MERS-CoV using RT-PCR technology in apparently healthy camels.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Revue scientifique et technique (International Office of Epizootics)en
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshCamelus
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus Infections
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirs
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMiddle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
dc.subject.meshMouth
dc.subject.meshNasal Mucosa
dc.subject.meshProtective Clothing
dc.subject.meshQatar
dc.subject.meshRNA, Viral
dc.subject.meshReal-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
dc.subject.meshRectum
dc.subject.meshReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshViral Load
dc.subject.meshVirus Shedding
dc.titleThe sample of choice for detecting Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in asymptomatic dromedary camels using real-time reversetranscription polymerase chain reaction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRev Sci Tech 2016; 35(3):905-11en
html.description.abstractThe newly identified Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which causes severe respiratory disease, particularly in people with comorbidities, requires further investigation. Studies in Qatar and elsewhere have provided evidence that dromedary camels are a reservoir for the virus, but the exact modes of transmission of MERS-CoV to humans remain unclear. In February 2014, an assessment was made of the suitability and sensitivity of different types of sample for the detection of MERSCoV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for three gene targets: UpE (upstream of the E gene), the N (nucleocapsid) gene and open reading frame (ORF) 1a. Fifty-three animals presented for slaughter were sampled. A high percentage of the sampled camels (79% [95% confidence interval 66.9-91.5%, standard error 0.0625]; 42 out of 53) were shown to be shedding MERS-CoV at the time of slaughter, yet all the animals were apparently healthy. Among the virus-positive animals, nasal swabs were most often positive (97.6%). Oral swabs were the second most frequently positive (35.7%), followed by rectal swabs (28.5%). In addition, the highest viral load, expressed as a cycle threshold (Ct) value of 11.27, was obtained from a nasal swab. These findings lead to the conclusion that nasal swabs are the candidate sample of choice for detecting MERS-CoV using RT-PCR technology in apparently healthy camels.


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