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dc.contributor.authorRuesen, Carolien
dc.contributor.authorChaidir, Lidya
dc.contributor.authorvan Laarhoven, Arjan
dc.contributor.authorDian, Sofiati
dc.contributor.authorGaniem, Ahmad Rizal
dc.contributor.authorNebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna
dc.contributor.authorHuynen, Martijn A
dc.contributor.authorAlisjahbana, Bachti
dc.contributor.authorDutilh, Bas E
dc.contributor.authorvan Crevel, Reinout
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-12T12:55:47Z
dc.date.available2018-02-12T12:55:47Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationLarge-scale genomic analysis shows association between homoplastic genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and meningeal or pulmonary tuberculosis. 2018, 19 (1):122 BMC Genomicsen
dc.identifier.issn1471-2164
dc.identifier.pmid29402222
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12864-018-4498-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621405
dc.description.abstractMeningitis is the most severe manifestation of tuberculosis. It is largely unknown why some people develop pulmonary TB (PTB) and others TB meningitis (TBM); we examined if the genetic background of infecting M. tuberculosis strains may be relevant.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMC genomicsen
dc.titleLarge-scale genomic analysis shows association between homoplastic genetic variation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and meningeal or pulmonary tuberculosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Genomics 2018; 19(1):122en
html.description.abstractMeningitis is the most severe manifestation of tuberculosis. It is largely unknown why some people develop pulmonary TB (PTB) and others TB meningitis (TBM); we examined if the genetic background of infecting M. tuberculosis strains may be relevant.


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