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dc.contributor.authorTeunis, Peter F M
dc.contributor.authorBonačić Marinović, Axel
dc.contributor.authorTribble, David R
dc.contributor.authorPorter, Chad K
dc.contributor.authorSwart, Arno
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T13:52:46Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T13:52:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-08
dc.identifier.citationAcute illness from Campylobacter jejuni may require high doses while infection occurs at low doses. 2018 Epidemicsen
dc.identifier.issn1878-0067
dc.identifier.pmid29456072
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.epidem.2018.02.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/621465
dc.description.abstractData from a set of different studies on the infectivity and pathogenicity of Campylobacter jejuni were analyzed with a multilevel model, allowing for effects of host species (nonhuman primates and humans) and different strains of the pathogen. All challenge studies involved high doses of the pathogen, resulting in all exposed subjects to become infected. In only one study a dose response effect (increasing trend with dose) for infection was observed. High susceptibility to infection with C. jejuni was found in a joint analysis of outbreaks and challenge studies. For that reason four outbreaks, associated with raw milk consumption, were also included in the present study. The high doses used for inoculation did not cause all infected subjects to develop acute enteric symptoms. The observed outcomes are consistent with a dose response effect for acute symptoms among infected subjects: a conditional illness dose response relation. Nonhuman primates and human volunteers did not appear to have different susceptibilities for developing enteric symptoms, but exposure in outbreaks (raw milk) did lead to a higher probability of symptomatic campylobacteriosis.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemicsen
dc.titleAcute illness from Campylobacter jejuni may require high doses while infection occurs at low doses.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEpidemics 2018; 24:1-20en
html.description.abstractData from a set of different studies on the infectivity and pathogenicity of Campylobacter jejuni were analyzed with a multilevel model, allowing for effects of host species (nonhuman primates and humans) and different strains of the pathogen. All challenge studies involved high doses of the pathogen, resulting in all exposed subjects to become infected. In only one study a dose response effect (increasing trend with dose) for infection was observed. High susceptibility to infection with C. jejuni was found in a joint analysis of outbreaks and challenge studies. For that reason four outbreaks, associated with raw milk consumption, were also included in the present study. The high doses used for inoculation did not cause all infected subjects to develop acute enteric symptoms. The observed outcomes are consistent with a dose response effect for acute symptoms among infected subjects: a conditional illness dose response relation. Nonhuman primates and human volunteers did not appear to have different susceptibilities for developing enteric symptoms, but exposure in outbreaks (raw milk) did lead to a higher probability of symptomatic campylobacteriosis.


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