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dc.contributor.authorKretzschmar, Mirjam
dc.contributor.authorHeijne, Janneke C M
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-02T11:09:02Z
dc.date.available2018-08-02T11:09:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-08
dc.identifier.citationPair formation models for sexually transmitted infections: A primer. 2017, 2 (3):368-378 Infect Dis Modelen
dc.identifier.issn2468-0427
dc.identifier.pmid29928748
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.idm.2017.07.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/622080
dc.description.abstractFor modelling sexually transmitted infections, duration of partnerships can strongly influence the transmission dynamics of the infection. If partnerships are monogamous, pairs of susceptible individuals are protected from becoming infected, while pairs of infected individuals delay onward transmission of the infection as long as they persist. In addition, for curable infections re-infection from an infected partner may occur. Furthermore, interventions based on contact tracing rely on the possibility of identifying and treating partners of infected individuals. To reflect these features in a mathematical model, pair formation models were introduced to mathematical epidemiology in the 1980's. They have since been developed into a widely used tool in modelling sexually transmitted infections and the impact of interventions. Here we give a basic introduction to the concepts of pair formation models for a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic. We review some results and applications of pair formation models mainly in the context of chlamydia infection.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen
dc.titlePair formation models for sexually transmitted infections: A primer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInfect Dis Model 2018; 2(3):368-78en
html.description.abstractFor modelling sexually transmitted infections, duration of partnerships can strongly influence the transmission dynamics of the infection. If partnerships are monogamous, pairs of susceptible individuals are protected from becoming infected, while pairs of infected individuals delay onward transmission of the infection as long as they persist. In addition, for curable infections re-infection from an infected partner may occur. Furthermore, interventions based on contact tracing rely on the possibility of identifying and treating partners of infected individuals. To reflect these features in a mathematical model, pair formation models were introduced to mathematical epidemiology in the 1980's. They have since been developed into a widely used tool in modelling sexually transmitted infections and the impact of interventions. Here we give a basic introduction to the concepts of pair formation models for a susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic. We review some results and applications of pair formation models mainly in the context of chlamydia infection.


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