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dc.contributor.authorRiedel, Natalie
dc.contributor.authorKöckler, Heike
dc.contributor.authorScheiner, Joachim
dc.contributor.authorvan Kamp, Irene
dc.contributor.authorErbel, Raimund
dc.contributor.authorLoerbroks, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorClaßen, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBolte, Gabriele
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-03T10:11:04Z
dc.date.available2018-08-03T10:11:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-26
dc.identifier.citationUrban road traffic noise and noise annoyance-a study on perceived noise control and its value among the elderly. 2018 Eur J Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1464-360X
dc.identifier.pmid30052879
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/eurpub/cky141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/622119
dc.description.abstractNoise annoyance may reflect a pro-participatory attitude towards public information and consultation according to the European Environmental Noise Directive. However, noise annoyance is also indicative of a stress response to perceived uncontrollable noise exposure. Using cross-sectional data on a sample of elderly citizens (n = 1772), we investigated whether the value residents ascribed to being able to control noise exposure at home moderated the potential indirect effect of road traffic noise on annoyance through perceived noise control. Our results confirmed the presence of such a moderated mediation, which may justify studying the impact of residents' valuing perceived noise control on participation readiness.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen
dc.titleUrban road traffic noise and noise annoyance-a study on perceived noise control and its value among the elderly.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEur J Public Health 2019; 29(2):377-9en
html.description.abstractNoise annoyance may reflect a pro-participatory attitude towards public information and consultation according to the European Environmental Noise Directive. However, noise annoyance is also indicative of a stress response to perceived uncontrollable noise exposure. Using cross-sectional data on a sample of elderly citizens (n = 1772), we investigated whether the value residents ascribed to being able to control noise exposure at home moderated the potential indirect effect of road traffic noise on annoyance through perceived noise control. Our results confirmed the presence of such a moderated mediation, which may justify studying the impact of residents' valuing perceived noise control on participation readiness.


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