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dc.contributor.authorvan Erp, Elisabeth A
dc.contributor.authorFeyaerts, Dorien
dc.contributor.authorDuijst, Maxime
dc.contributor.authorMulder, H Lie
dc.contributor.authorWicht, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorLuytjes, Willem
dc.contributor.authorFerwerda, Gerben
dc.contributor.authorvan Kasteren, Puck B
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-19T13:09:15Z
dc.date.available2018-11-19T13:09:15Z
dc.date.issued2018-09-25
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects primary neonatal and adult natural killer cells and affects their anti-viral effector function. 2018 J. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1537-6613
dc.identifier.pmid30252097
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiy566
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/622250
dc.description.abstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants. Natural killer (NK) cells are important anti-viral effector cells that likely encounter RSV in the presence of virus-specific (maternal) antibodies. Since NK cells potentially contribute to immunopathology, we investigated whether RSV affects their anti-viral effector functions.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Journal of infectious diseasesen
dc.titleRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects primary neonatal and adult natural killer cells and affects their anti-viral effector function.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJ Infect Dis 2019; 219(5):723-33en
html.description.abstractRespiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants. Natural killer (NK) cells are important anti-viral effector cells that likely encounter RSV in the presence of virus-specific (maternal) antibodies. Since NK cells potentially contribute to immunopathology, we investigated whether RSV affects their anti-viral effector functions.


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