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dc.contributor.authorReitsema, Maarten
dc.contributor.authorSteffers, Linda
dc.contributor.authorVisser, Maartje
dc.contributor.authorHeijne, Janneke
dc.contributor.authorHoek, Albert Jan Van
dc.contributor.authorLoeff, Maarten Schim Van Der
dc.contributor.authorvan Sighem, Ard
dc.contributor.authorvan Benthem, Birgit
dc.contributor.authorWallinga, Jacco
dc.contributor.authorXiridou, Maria
dc.contributor.authorMangen, Marie-Josee
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-28T08:20:04Z
dc.date.available2019-03-28T08:20:04Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-15
dc.identifier.issn1473-5571
dc.identifier.pmid30889012
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/QAD.0000000000002199
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/622991
dc.description.abstractTo assess the cost-effectiveness of increased consistent HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Netherlands. Among MSM testing at STI clinics in the Netherlands in 2014-2015, approximately 20% tested consistently every six months. We examined four scenarios with increased percentage of MSM testing every six months: a small and a moderate increase among all MSM; a small and a moderate increase only among MSM with ≥10 partners in the preceding six months. We used an agent-based model to calculate numbers of HIV infections and AIDS cases prevented with increased HIV testing. These numbers were used in an economic model to calculate costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALY), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) due to increased testing, over 2018-2027, taking a healthcare payer perspective. A small increase in the percentage testing every six months among all MSM resulted in 490 averted HIV infections and an average ICER of &OV0556;27,900/QALY gained. A moderate increase among all MSM, resulted in 1380 averted HIV infections and an average ICER of &OV0556;36,700/QALY gained. Both were not cost-effective, with a &OV0556;20,000 willingness-to-pay threshold. Increasing the percentage testing every six months only among MSM with ≥10 partners in the preceding six months resulted in less averted HIV infections than increased testing among all MSM, but was on average cost-saving. Increased HIV testing can prevent considerable numbers of new HIV infections among MSM, but may be cost-effective only if targeted at high-risk individuals, such as those with many partners.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccess
dc.titleCost-effectiveness of increased hiv testing among MSM in the netherlands.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalAIDS 2019; 33(12):1807-17en_US
dc.source.journaltitleAIDS (London, England)


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