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dc.contributor.authorvan Kamp, I
dc.contributor.authorvan Kempen, EEMM
dc.contributor.authorSimon, SN
dc.contributor.authorBaliatsas, C
dc.date.accessioned20200419
dc.date.available2020-01-31T12:52:53Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-28
dc.identifier.doi10.21945/RIVM-2019-0088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/623653
dc.description.abstractIn 2018 the WHO Guidelines for Environmental Noise were published. The Guidelines are based on reviews of the scientific literature between 2000 and 2015. Since then many new publications have emerged, describing results of existing and new studies of good quality, which were not yet part of the WHO reviews. Also, these reviews did not cover all noise sources relevant for noise policies in the UK. These include, apart from transport noise and wind turbine noise, noise from neighbours and the neighbourhood, industrial noise and low frequency noise from building services such as heat pumps, cooling-and ventilation systems. RIVM investigated whether there is sufficient new evidence to make an update to the literature reviews worthwhile for the noise policies in the UK. RIVM is of the view that there is sufficient new evidence that warrants an update to the WHO reviews on the health effects of noise from transport and wind turbines for some health outcomes. RIVM also thinks it important to study the health effects of other sources in more detail. However, more research is needed to do this in a proper way; evidence for an association between health effects and these other sources is scarce or has been understudied This literature review was prepared at the request the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) of the UK and on behalf of the Interdepartmental Group on Costs and Benefits Noise Subject Group (IGCB(N)). DEFRA asked RIVM to provide advice, since they have a good overview of the literature and evidence in the noise and health domain. To support the advice, this report summarises the results of the literature published between 2014 and the end of 2019 in relation to transport and wind turbine noise and between 2000 and 2019 in relation to noise sources not included in the WHO reviews.
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs DEFRAen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRIVM report 2019-0088en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/2019-0088.pdf
dc.rights.uri
dc.subjectRIVM report 2019-0088
dc.subjectRIVM report 2019-0088
dc.titleReview of Evidence Relating to Environmental Noise Exposure and Annoyance, Sleep Disturbance, Cardio-Vascular and Metabolic Health Outcomes in the Context of the Interdepartmental Group on Costs and Benefits Noise Subject Group (IGCB(N))en_US
dc.title.alternativeLiteratuuroverzicht van bewijs van een relatie tussen omgevingsgeluid en hinder, slaapverstoring, hart en vaatziekten en stofwisselingseffecten in de context van de Interdepartementale Kosten en Baten Groep met betrekking tot geluid (IGCB(N))en_US
dc.typeReport
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-31T12:52:53Z
html.description.abstractIn 2018 the WHO Guidelines for Environmental Noise were published. The Guidelines are based on reviews of the scientific literature between 2000 and 2015. Since then many new publications have emerged, describing results of existing and new studies of good quality, which were not yet part of the WHO reviews. Also, these reviews did not cover all noise sources relevant for noise policies in the UK. These include, apart from transport noise and wind turbine noise, noise from neighbours and the neighbourhood, industrial noise and low frequency noise from building services such as heat pumps, cooling-and ventilation systems. RIVM investigated whether there is sufficient new evidence to make an update to the literature reviews worthwhile for the noise policies in the UK. RIVM is of the view that there is sufficient new evidence that warrants an update to the WHO reviews on the health effects of noise from transport and wind turbines for some health outcomes. RIVM also thinks it important to study the health effects of other sources in more detail. However, more research is needed to do this in a proper way; evidence for an association between health effects and these other sources is scarce or has been understudied This literature review was prepared at the request the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) of the UK and on behalf of the Interdepartmental Group on Costs and Benefits Noise Subject Group (IGCB(N)). DEFRA asked RIVM to provide advice, since they have a good overview of the literature and evidence in the noise and health domain. To support the advice, this report summarises the results of the literature published between 2014 and the end of 2019 in relation to transport and wind turbine noise and between 2000 and 2019 in relation to noise sources not included in the WHO reviews.en


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