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dc.contributor.authorvan Aar, Fleur
dc.contributor.authorKroone, Michelle M
dc.contributor.authorde Vries, Henry JC
dc.contributor.authorGötz, Hannelore M
dc.contributor.authorvan Benthem, Birgit Hb
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-25T19:56:59Z
dc.date.available2020-05-25T19:56:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-01
dc.identifier.issn1560-7917
dc.identifier.pmid32290900
dc.identifier.doi10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.14.1900377
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/623826
dc.description.abstractIntroductionLymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), an invasive form of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, has been reported among (mainly HIV-positive) men who have sex with men (MSM) since 2003. In the Netherlands, LGV testing recommendations changed from selective to universal testing in 2015. Changes in tested populations could have led to incomparable LGV positivity rates over time.AimWe investigated LGV trends among MSM attending Centres for Sexual Health using surveillance data between 2011 and 2017.MethodsLGV positivity was calculated among MSM tested for rectal Chlamydia infection and MSM tested specifically for LGV. With multivariable logistic regression analysis, the association between years and LGV was adjusted for testing indicators and determinants.ResultsWe included 224,194 consultations. LGV increased from 86 in 2011 to 270 in 2017. Among LGV-positives, proportions of HIV-negative and asymptomatic MSM increased from 17.4% to 45.6% and from 31.4% to 49.3%, respectively, between 2011 and 2017. Among MSM tested for rectal chlamydia, LGV positivity increased from 0.12% to 0.33% among HIV-negatives and remained stable around 2.5% among HIV-positives. Among LGV-tested MSM, LGV positivity increased from 2.1% to 5.7% among HIV-negatives and from 15.1% to 22.1% among HIV-positives. Multivariable models showed increased odds ratios and significant positive associations between years and LGV.ConclusionsAlthough increased testing and changes in LGV incidence are difficult to disentangle, we found increasing LGV trends, especially when corrected for confounding. LGV was increasingly attributed to HIV-negative and asymptomatic MSM, among whom testing was previously limited. This stresses the importance of universal testing and continuous surveillance.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectHIV infectionen_US
dc.subjectLymphogranuloma venereumen_US
dc.subjectMSMen_US
dc.subjectSentinel Surveillanceen_US
dc.subjectasymptomatic infectionen_US
dc.subjectepidemiologyen_US
dc.titleIncreasing trends of lymphogranuloma venereum among HIV-negative and asymptomatic men who have sex with men, the Netherlands, 2011 to 2017.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.journalEuro Surveill 2020; 25(4):pii.1900377en_US
dc.source.journaltitleEuro surveillance : bulletin Europeen sur les maladies transmissibles = European communicable disease bulletin


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