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dc.contributor.authorBrummelen, S E van
dc.contributor.authorVries, E de
dc.contributor.authorSchneeberger, P M
dc.contributor.authorBinnendijk, R S van
dc.contributor.authorLestrade, P
dc.contributor.authorWever, P C
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-03T12:34:26Z
dc.date.available2007-01-03T12:34:26Z
dc.date.issued2006-08-05
dc.identifier.citationNed Tijdschr Geneeskd 2006, 150(31):1732-5en
dc.identifier.issn0028-2162
dc.identifier.pmid16924947
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/6775
dc.description.abstractTwo patients, men aged 17 and 19 years respectively, were admitted with parotitis epidemica and orchitis caused by mumps. The second patient also had meningitis. PCR analysis revealed that, in both cases, the causative agentwas a mumps virus that was genetically related to a wild-type virus responsible for an outbreak in Singapore. This viral strain was also responsible for a mumps outbreak at Hotel School The Hague in September 2004. Both patients were not fully vaccinated. Both patients were from regions in which clustering of patients with clinical signs of mumps has been seen. Interestingly, a number of patients with confirmed mumps had been fully vaccinated. Possible explanations for the increase in mumps cases include low vaccination and immunity levels, primary and secondary vaccine failure and the emergence of genetically disparate mumps viruses.
dc.format.extent66183 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageduten
dc.language.ison/aen
dc.titleTwee patienten met de bofen
dc.title.alternativeTwo patients with mumpsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T14:44:33Z
html.description.abstractTwo patients, men aged 17 and 19 years respectively, were admitted with parotitis epidemica and orchitis caused by mumps. The second patient also had meningitis. PCR analysis revealed that, in both cases, the causative agentwas a mumps virus that was genetically related to a wild-type virus responsible for an outbreak in Singapore. This viral strain was also responsible for a mumps outbreak at Hotel School The Hague in September 2004. Both patients were not fully vaccinated. Both patients were from regions in which clustering of patients with clinical signs of mumps has been seen. Interestingly, a number of patients with confirmed mumps had been fully vaccinated. Possible explanations for the increase in mumps cases include low vaccination and immunity levels, primary and secondary vaccine failure and the emergence of genetically disparate mumps viruses.


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