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dc.contributor.authorKruit, Mark C
dc.contributor.authorLauner, Lenore J
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Michel D
dc.contributor.authorBuchem, Mark A van
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-10T11:06:27Z
dc.date.available2007-01-10T11:06:27Z
dc.date.issued2006-04-01
dc.identifier.citationStroke 2006, 37(4):1109-12en
dc.identifier.issn1524-4628
dc.identifier.pmid16497982
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/01.STR.0000206446.26702.e9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/7166
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Migraineurs are at increased risk of cerebellar infarcts and supratentorial white matter lesions. The prevalence, frequency, and distribution of infratentorial hyperintense lesions in migraine are unknown. METHODS: Migraineurs with aura (n=161), without aura (n=134), and controls (n=140) from a population-based sample of adults (30 to 60 years of age) were evaluated with MRI. RESULTS: Infratentorial hyperintensities were identified in 13 of 295 (4.4%) migraineurs and in 1 of 140 (0.7%) controls (P=0.04). Twelve cases had hyperintensities, mostly bilaterally, in the dorsal basis pontis. Those with infratentorial hyperintensities also had supratentorial white matter lesions more often. CONCLUSIONS: We found an increased prevalence of infratentorial (mostly pontine) hyperintensities in migraineurs from the general population. This extends the knowledge about vulnerable brain regions and type of lesions in migraine brains. A hemodynamic ischemic pathogenesis is likely, but further research is needed.
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dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleBrain stem and cerebellar hyperintense lesions in migraine.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T14:53:24Z
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Migraineurs are at increased risk of cerebellar infarcts and supratentorial white matter lesions. The prevalence, frequency, and distribution of infratentorial hyperintense lesions in migraine are unknown. METHODS: Migraineurs with aura (n=161), without aura (n=134), and controls (n=140) from a population-based sample of adults (30 to 60 years of age) were evaluated with MRI. RESULTS: Infratentorial hyperintensities were identified in 13 of 295 (4.4%) migraineurs and in 1 of 140 (0.7%) controls (P=0.04). Twelve cases had hyperintensities, mostly bilaterally, in the dorsal basis pontis. Those with infratentorial hyperintensities also had supratentorial white matter lesions more often. CONCLUSIONS: We found an increased prevalence of infratentorial (mostly pontine) hyperintensities in migraineurs from the general population. This extends the knowledge about vulnerable brain regions and type of lesions in migraine brains. A hemodynamic ischemic pathogenesis is likely, but further research is needed.


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