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dc.contributor.authorSemret, Makeda
dc.contributor.authorTurenne, Christine Y
dc.contributor.authorHaas, Petra de
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Desmond M
dc.contributor.authorBehr, Marcel A
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-10T12:24:40Z
dc.date.available2007-01-10T12:24:40Z
dc.date.issued2006-03-01
dc.identifier.citationJ. Clin. Microbiol. 2006, 44(3):881-7en
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137
dc.identifier.pmid16517871
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JCM.44.3.881-887.2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/7175
dc.description.abstractThe Mycobacterium avium species consists of a group of organisms that are genetically related but phenotypically diverse, with certain variants presenting clear differences in terms of their host association and disease manifestations. The ability to distinguish between these subtypes is of relevance for accurate diagnosis and for control programs. Using a comparative genomics approach, we have uncovered large sequence polymorphisms that are, respectively, absent from bird-type M. avium isolates and from cattle types and sheep types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. By evaluating the distribution of these genomic polymorphisms across a panel of strains, we were able to assign unique genomic signatures to these host-associated variants. We propose a simple PCR-based strategy based on these polymorphisms that can rapidly type M. avium isolates into these subgroups.
dc.format.extent459251 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleDifferentiating host-associated variants of Mycobacterium avium by PCR for detection of large sequence polymorphisms.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-18T14:53:59Z
html.description.abstractThe Mycobacterium avium species consists of a group of organisms that are genetically related but phenotypically diverse, with certain variants presenting clear differences in terms of their host association and disease manifestations. The ability to distinguish between these subtypes is of relevance for accurate diagnosis and for control programs. Using a comparative genomics approach, we have uncovered large sequence polymorphisms that are, respectively, absent from bird-type M. avium isolates and from cattle types and sheep types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. By evaluating the distribution of these genomic polymorphisms across a panel of strains, we were able to assign unique genomic signatures to these host-associated variants. We propose a simple PCR-based strategy based on these polymorphisms that can rapidly type M. avium isolates into these subgroups.


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