Multilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to identify potential sources of colonization in commercial turkey farms.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/622067
Title:
Multilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to identify potential sources of colonization in commercial turkey farms.
Authors:
Piccirillo, Alessandra; Giacomelli, Martina; Niero, Giulia; De Luca, Carlotta; Carraro, Lisa; Ortali, Giovanni; Mughini-Gras, Lapo
Abstract:
Poultry are the main reservoir for thermophilic Campylobacter spp., which is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry, particularly in turkeys, is not completely understood. This study aimed at identifying potential sources and transmission routes of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in commercial turkey farms. C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from breeders (n = 29, 20 C. jejuni and 9 C. coli) and their progeny (n = 51, 18 C. jejuni and 33 C. coli) reared in two different farms for three sequential production cycles were analysed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Strains (n = 88, 42 C. jejuni and 46 C. coli) isolated from environmental (i.e. anteroom and in-house overshoes), water (i.e. drinkers and water line), and pest (i.e. flies, Alphitobius diaperinus, and mice) sources were also examined. MLST of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates resulted in 13 and 12 different sequence types (STs) belonging to six and one previously-described clonal complexes (CCs), respectively. Three novel STs were identified. Genetic similarities were detected between isolates from fattening turkeys and the considered environmental, water, and pest sources, and with the breeders to a lesser extent. Source attribution analysis estimated that environmental and water sources accounted for most (∼75%) of fattening turkey isolates and were therefore identified as the most likely sources of flock colonization, followed by pests (∼20%) and breeders (∼5%). These sources may thus be targeted by control measures to mitigate the risk of Campylobacter colonization in commercial turkeys. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS High occurrence of C. jejuni and C. coli in commercial turkey flocks. High genetic diversity of C. jejuni and C. coli in commercial turkey flocks. Horizontal transmission responsible for Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks. Environmental and water sources involved in Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks. Strategies for prevention and control of Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks are needed.
Citation:
Multilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to identify potential sources of colonization in commercial turkey farms. 2018:1-12 Avian Pathol.
Journal:
Avian Pathol 2018; 13:1-30
Issue Date:
9-Jul-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10029/622067
DOI:
10.1080/03079457.2018.1487529
PubMed ID:
29897783
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1465-3338
Appears in Collections:
Miscellaneous

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPiccirillo, Alessandraen
dc.contributor.authorGiacomelli, Martinaen
dc.contributor.authorNiero, Giuliaen
dc.contributor.authorDe Luca, Carlottaen
dc.contributor.authorCarraro, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorOrtali, Giovannien
dc.contributor.authorMughini-Gras, Lapoen
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-17T12:50:03Z-
dc.date.available2018-07-17T12:50:03Z-
dc.date.issued2018-07-09-
dc.identifier.citationMultilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to identify potential sources of colonization in commercial turkey farms. 2018:1-12 Avian Pathol.en
dc.identifier.issn1465-3338-
dc.identifier.pmid29897783-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03079457.2018.1487529-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10029/622067-
dc.description.abstractPoultry are the main reservoir for thermophilic Campylobacter spp., which is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry, particularly in turkeys, is not completely understood. This study aimed at identifying potential sources and transmission routes of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in commercial turkey farms. C. jejuni and C. coli isolates from breeders (n = 29, 20 C. jejuni and 9 C. coli) and their progeny (n = 51, 18 C. jejuni and 33 C. coli) reared in two different farms for three sequential production cycles were analysed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Strains (n = 88, 42 C. jejuni and 46 C. coli) isolated from environmental (i.e. anteroom and in-house overshoes), water (i.e. drinkers and water line), and pest (i.e. flies, Alphitobius diaperinus, and mice) sources were also examined. MLST of C. jejuni and C. coli isolates resulted in 13 and 12 different sequence types (STs) belonging to six and one previously-described clonal complexes (CCs), respectively. Three novel STs were identified. Genetic similarities were detected between isolates from fattening turkeys and the considered environmental, water, and pest sources, and with the breeders to a lesser extent. Source attribution analysis estimated that environmental and water sources accounted for most (∼75%) of fattening turkey isolates and were therefore identified as the most likely sources of flock colonization, followed by pests (∼20%) and breeders (∼5%). These sources may thus be targeted by control measures to mitigate the risk of Campylobacter colonization in commercial turkeys. RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS High occurrence of C. jejuni and C. coli in commercial turkey flocks. High genetic diversity of C. jejuni and C. coli in commercial turkey flocks. Horizontal transmission responsible for Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks. Environmental and water sources involved in Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks. Strategies for prevention and control of Campylobacter colonization of commercial turkey flocks are needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccessen
dc.titleMultilocus sequence typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to identify potential sources of colonization in commercial turkey farms.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAvian Pathol 2018; 13:1-30en
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